Welcome

The English Companions promotes interest and research into the Anglo-Saxon era (AD 450-1100). A quarterly magazine, “Widowinde” is published and the Gegaderung (which may be accessed from this Website) has ongoing information and discussions of interest.

An Old English correspondence course enables members to learn both the written and spoken language. Local groups, organised on a scir basis, arrange their own meetings and attend lectures, exhibitions and events; some events attended include  “Living History Groups. The English Companions maintains a strictly neutral line on modern political and religious matters.

 

Recent Posts:

The Black Poplar Tree in Anglo-Saxon England

By Peter C Horn
The distinguished botanist, the late Edgar Milne-Redhead, from the mid 1970′s, did much to draw attention to the Black Poplar, Populus nigra subsp. betulifolia, as a splended, but largely overlooked, English native tree.  In a letter to the writer, in 1993, he mentioned that he was overwhelmed by correrpondence received, over 500 letters, regarding [...]

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AT ETHANDUN

At Ethandun AElfred and Guthrum
with spear and shield sharp war-hedge
faced each other to fight for Wessex
messengers spoke insults exchanged
for spear and swordplay steadied the Danes

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THE ALCOHOLIC DRINKS OF THE ANGLO-SAXONS

The four alcoholic drinks of the Anglo-Saxons were beor, ealu, medu and win. Today we have similar names for some alcoholic drinks, i.e. beer, ale, mead and wine, and it is commonly, and quite naturally, assumed that our modern drinks must be similar to those bearing similar names in Old English.

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