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Author Topic: The Name on the Rose  (Read 686 times)

Bowerthane

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The Name on the Rose
« on: February 27, 2017, 02:58:30 PM »
( Was going to add this to the ‘What’s Everybody Watching?’ thread. But it’s gorn).


Guess who got to see the DVD of The Name of the Rose, 2004 directed by Jean-Jaques Annaud, the other night?  Yes, the one with Sean Connery as Brother William of Baskerville.

Can I be the only one who loved seeing an all-singing, all-dancing medieval monastic scriptorium re-created, eh?  The illuminated folios were all real too, taking up to three months by a restoration company in Italy.  The filmmakers used a real monastery, Eberbach in the valley of the Rhine, for the scriptorium as for most other indoor scenes.  The main exception was the secret library.  That was re-created in a studio in Rome, Annaud having talked it through with Umberto Eco, himself.

There was no real cause for complaint, as my better judgment knows that any dramatic adaptation has to make cuts, but obviously I was disappointed that none of the Venerable Bede’s lost works were portrayed in the library.  But then that’s probably just as well as my weeping heart is my most vivid memory of the fire when I read the novel.  Sean Connery did a fine Grief-Stricken Moment didn’t he, bending choked-up over one stack of books as the flames reared?  However, did anybody else feel that the filmmakers had gone to town on the Hieronymus Bosch side to medieval life rather too well, maybe?  Not because, to our modern sensibilities, the yuk-factor is unrealistic, but if you labour the point it gets in the way of the story?  I caught myself reminded of Monty Python and the Holy Grail and Jabberwocky a mite too often.

Does anyone else wonder whether Eco had the monastery at Bobbio in mind, for his setting?  That was on an eastern shoulder of the Italian Alps with “one of the most extensive libraries in the West” by the ninth century, including Classical works even in our period.  Bobbio had English connections because it was on our pilgrim route, and if I could find all those notes I took for my kiddies’ book I could be sure it was founded by an Irishman.  So don’t quote me about it having its own branch of Marks & Spencers and a long tradition of Morris dancing.

Watching The Name of the Rose has reminded me of whether I dare insinuate some lost or hypothetical books into my own literary masterpiece, or allege that Bishop Alcuin finished that translation of the Gospel of St John the Venerable Bede was working on when he died.  Or portray a copy of Pliny’s German Wars or at least a summary, say, with an illustration of Weleda doomsaying from her tower. Already Lady Ethelflæda has read aloud my imaginary entry from Bede’s commentary from the Gospel of St Matthew ( explaining what a palm tree is, with an illustration), a definitely non-existent Summary of Abdul Al-Hazred has made a cameo appearance, as well as a few mentions of a tongue-in-cheek Black Bestiary of Bodminster, the existence of which adult characters regard as a joke ( nobody’s met anyone who’s seen it).  Yet as a Cornish book it does serve notice that books by the Cornish Church may well have existed, though in all poker-faced sobriety they’d be conventional gospels, psalters, hymnals, patristic works and the like.  ‘Mentions’ of Bede’s lost titles also appear, and of performances of his lost hymns some of which are included in Lady Ethelflæda’s personal psalter, too.

We do know that one of Lucan’s lost poems, Orpheus, was in existence in Canterbury in Aldhelm’s day and that he knew of something called the Codex Etruscus, as well as how quotations from classical sources not otherwise attested ( a lost poet called Paulus Questor) or specified ( Seneca and  Terence, say) occur, perhaps strangely, in works by earlier Old English churchmen rather than the later ones.  However I have failed to nail a story I’m sure I once read, that Archbishop Theodore brought a copy of the Iliad here with him.  I’d love a ġesīþa to prove me wrong ( Theodore definitely studied at Athens as a young man) but persistent failure leads me to believe that story is untrue.  Had Old English churchmen read Homer we’d surely know by the influence, as we would by Vergil’s even without Old English copies of the Ænid.  Bede had one in his library as well as a Liber Enoch, of which I may make use because Enochian material ( the War in Heaven) has proven my best hope of stopping the churchy stuff boring the backside off child readers.  Give or take the Holy Foot of Iconium, St Paulinus releasing the Nolans and ill-recalled Bible quotes like Two feet of mud are better than one.

Does anyone have any requests?  Would a Wonders of St Trinian be worth a joke about why “the Picts of old were ruled by their mothers”, or is that on the wrong side of silly even for a target readership in the nine-to-fourteen bracket?  A perfectly sensible Pictish tapestry has come to light in a linen chest, I hasten to add, and if Pictish books had found their way into Old English hands, what could our ancestors have read about?





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The moral right of the author to identify 2010: The Year We Make Contact as almost as boring and morally pretentious as 2001: A Space Odyssey has been asserted. 

Phyllis

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2017, 06:22:01 PM »
A Pictish Cookbook on how to deep fry pottage? (Runs for cover)

I'm not sure if St Trinians is sufficiently up-to-date for today's kids? The remakes is already a bit old (or have I missed some newer ones?). It seems to me they're all about Harry Potter and Diary of a Wimpy Kid, so there may be material there?

Now I must go and dig out a copy of NotR and relive the pleasure. I loved the book and thoroughly enjoyed the film, back in the day :)


Phyllis

Bowerthane

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2017, 11:26:10 AM »
Nice one Phyllis, thanks.  I fear you are right that the St Trinians joke opus has had its day, as indeed I fear the one about the Nolans will be understood by parents and teachers rather than child readers.  Cryptic allusions to Ripping Yarns, Peter Cook and Dudley Moor’s Dedazzled etc. have been planted “for eyes to see that can”: I was chuffed as hell to discover there really was a Saint Beryl, if of Antioch rather than Norfolk, known to the Old English.  Yet for making children laugh, there’s just one tiny little snag with Harry Potter-and-shop: I hate it!  I’ve proofread better children’s writers than J. K. Rowling to boot, so her success irks me.

I’d recommend Philip Pullman and Suzanne Collins to your youngsters and everybody else’s.  It may be no exaggeration to say that Pullman is Britain’s greatest living author, certainly one of the greatest of all time.  If his His Dark Materials trilogy doesn’t interest you ( despite the Gnostic, Miltonian, Blakean, antinomian etc subtext that, again, child readers hardly notice but some of we big hairy grown-ups know when we see it) try his Sally Lockhart novels.  They are more adult-friendly and evoke the Victorian period in a fresh and engaging way.  Pullman is vigorously antimodernist in that he believes in telling a good story and does so, brilliantly.

Only last week I laid hands on Suzanne Collins’ Mockingjay, which I’m reading carefully because pacing is one of my shortcomings as a storyteller, whereas Collins achieves textbook perfection in The Hunger Games.  So I’m taking notes trying to fathom how the dickens she does it!  I’m haunted by the fear that all the fussy details I try not to get bogged down in, especially ones I’ve angled to give children hints and glints as to what else can be said for the Old English if only they’d give them a chance, will have to be pruned at the insistence of some editor or other. 

Granted the odds are in favour of this incredible puppy ever getting finished, never mind accepted for publication...

If you’d read Pullman’s Northern Lights, did you notice the place-name Falkshall Gardens ( chapter four, folio 75 line 33 of my edition) amongst others he made up for the ‘world’ he created for Lyra Belaqua’s adventures?  It’s in the right place for the Vauxhall area of London, which as you may know is a gallicised version of Old English folces heall, viz. the kind of hall where a medieval lord kept ‘open house’ such that visitors, estate workers, off-duty servants etc could use, and where beggars and cripples might be fed or allowed to get warm in winter.  Or so the story went when I last knew anything about it. 

So in ‘Lyra’s world’ there may have been no Norman Conquest! 

In their National Gallery they may have a victorious version of the Bayeux Tapestry showing Harold II hewing down William the Conktoofar at his standard, with two or three panserbjørne splatting the Norman cavalry every which way.

Furthermore, all the Old English characters we know and love would have dæmons.  For those who don’t know, people in the ‘parallel universe’ of Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy have souls outside their bodies in the form of animals which, as puberty kicks in, cease to be metamorphic and settle into this or that beast or bird that expresses somewhat of the character of the individual.  So domestic servants often have dogs, Lyra’s settled into a polecat, and the Master of Jordan College, Oxford’s is a raven.  Now a raven sounds just right for the Venerable Bede, doesn’t it?  And since Lord Asriel’s dæmon was a snow leopard, what about a white boarhound for King Alfred?  ( Great Danes are the nearest thing left to boarhounds, if my information is correct). 

But what about Lady Ethelflæda?  A wildcat?  Or Edric Streona ( one of those two-headed snakes out of Wonders of the East?)?  An Old English sheepdog for Bishop Wulfstan of Worcester?  A dragonfly for Brother Elmer?   
 
What would Duke William’s dæmon be, puffing out in eldritch flames as King Harold’s killing stroke clefts his helm in twain?  Or Lady Godiva’s ( other women would notice, surely)?

Yes, this is cool isn’t it?  Suggestions anyone?



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 The moral right of the author to be identified by his dæmon, a Fen rat, has been asserted.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2017, 01:58:55 PM by Bowerthane »

Phyllis

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2017, 08:55:16 PM »
Big Pullman fan here - just working my way through his version of the Grimm's Tales :)

I love the idea of dæmons for the Anglo Saxons. I reckon Aelfric might have an Owl.
Phyllis

Eanflaed

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2017, 08:49:21 AM »
As Bowerthane's would be a fen rat, mine would be a puppy - always curious, always ready to play, but knowing where my loyalties lie! (And always getting up again when slapped down, though having learned a lesson!!) . What about other folk? (Notice I'm including us under the AS umbrella! Sorry if I'm dumbing down!)
« Last Edit: March 06, 2017, 08:54:45 AM by Eanflaed »

Bowerthane

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2017, 02:53:35 PM »

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I reckon Aelfric might have an Owl.
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Yes, I can see how that would work.  And what about a nightingale for Cædmon?


Also I’m having second thoughts about King Alfred.  Deerhounds have a studious mien whilst remaining as brave and pertinacious as any hunting hound, so what about a deerhound for King Alfred?

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Sorry if I'm dumbing down!
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Not at all, Eanflaed.  You were very :-*  sweet.





Bowerthane

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2017, 02:22:10 PM »
Right, first I’ll get off my chest some more thoughts I’ve had about dæmons!

Edmund Ironside would have the boarhound, I’ve been thinking, Harold II a ram and surely Beowulf would have a panther? According to Wonders of the East panthers are natural foes of dragons.  Wayland a sooty tern?  Wade an osprey?  Unferth a grass snake, maybe?

Hereward the Wake would have a crane or heron, as wading birds would suit Fenlanders as well as water-rats.   

(  Mind you, it’s the Gyptian chap in the opening scene of the film I feel sorry for, especially as Gyptians live on narrowboats.  In one of the very first frames, just as the camera closes in on Ma Costa shouting, “Billy, you come back here!” as the children tear off, he comes to her shoulder stroking the head of a horse. 

I mean… fancy having a dæmon the size of a horse.

Or have I got it all wrong again?  Maybe he did something cruel or unnatural to a horse in an earlier life so he has to bunk with a horse dæmon in this one, and serve him right.

Love horses, me.)



---oo0oo---



However, what I should really like to do is share my joy with the world because I have found those notes I mentioned.  In my ‘science’ folder ( :-[ ahem). 

It turns out Saint Columban himself founded Bobbio monastery “near the river Trebbia and close to the northern end of the Apennines ( c. 614)” if Thought and Letters in Western Europe by M. L. W. Laistner is anything to go by.  Its links were “with the North rather than the South” and it did have “one of the most extensive libraries in the West” in our period according to Stephen Greenblatt’s The Swerve, How the Renaissance Began.  Books of interest to Germans included Tacitus’ Germania, whereas Classical works included Cicero’s Verrines from which one scholar, Jonas of Bobbio, quotes, a rare ‘fix’ on a copy of Ovid ( which enjoyed a shadowy existence in our period, as it contained useful background material for making sense of scripture, but mixed in with Pagan material and just-plain rude stuff, so churchmen seem to know what’s in it but don’t like talking about it) as well as a copy of Titus Lucretius Carus’ poem De Rerum Natura.  Inspired by Leucippus and Democritus’ atomic theory, this offered a naturalistic explanation for life, the universe and everything and therefore became an increasingly queer and disturbing work to early Christians until the middle of the ninth century, when it dropped off the historiographical radar entirely, because ( presumably) it had sunk in with churchmen that they were preserving a threat to faith.  Bobbio’s library had a copy according to a ninth-century catalogue, maybe the very one rediscovered by the Renaissance scribe Poggio Bracciolini ( if it wasn’t at Fulda, Murbach or Reichenau which are also known to have had copies in our period).  Bobbio was also where the Irish/ Scottish scholar and astronomer Dungal retired after teaching at Pavia, the Lombard capital on the Po.  He’s known to have read and carefully amended a copy of Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura, too.

I nearly didn’t bother to look at Wikipedia. Yet when I did I found that I’m a Johnny-come-lately in suspecting that Umberto Eco had Bobbio in mind when he wrote The Name of the Rose.  Entries for the monastery and village that grew up nearby both mention this.

Would anyone care to help with a niggle I fear for my kiddies’ book?  It’s this name Bobbio.  I’m afraid it’ll present a Giggle Factor in a book aimed at nine-to-fourteen-year-olds, but I can’t easily think of a plausible synonym or affectionate nickname by which I might get away with portraying Old English pilgrims calling it, instead.  I’ve lightly anglicized some Old English-related German place-names, so Eichstätt, Hersfeld and Ochsenfurt become *Oaksted, *Hersfield and *Oxenford, partly in fear the originals will be boring, awkward and intimidating, partly as a way to suggest the generically germanic character the Old English shared with other germanic peoples without pressing that button in people’s heads ( maybe especially youngsters’ heads) that conjures up a whole raft of Sieg-heil stereotypes and other, jerk assumptions.  Herford in Westfalia, where female scribes are known to have worked in our period, is in fact spelled Herford today and, yes, I’m looking into the possibility of the Old English-led conversion of the Germans influencing Germany’s place-names.  For instance, given that Heathen Germans wouldn’t call anywhere local a mynster ( which anyhow Old English borrowed from Latin), and since the Old English founded most of their first monasteries, is this in any way responsible for the name of the modern-day city of Münster, where a bishopric was founded in AD 814, and of Rotthalmünster in Bavaria, where a nunnery existed by the ninth century?  St Boniface’s tomb at Fulda, be it known, was visited by Old English pilgrims, as was Aachen.  Enough for another Old English foundation, Echternach in AD 698, to have “a little monastery for peregrini” from England: just as Langres, Lyon and Auxerre ( where the monks ran a xenodochium or hostel specially for Old English pilgrims, giving them advice on crossing the Alps) and Bobbio itself as they came down the other side, then Pavia-on-the-Po ( where “St Mary of the Britons” was another xenodochium for pilgrims from the British Isles generally) were all stopovers for Old English pilgrims on their way to Rome.

The best I can do is “St Columban’s-in-the-Alps” but something pithier would serve better. Does Trebford sound plausible?  Or too banal?  Or am I overthinking things again?

May I also raise a less selfish point?  The archiepiscopal see of Mainz is the only one besides the Vatican to be officially named a Holy See.  As I’ve been learning, in St Boniface’s day the papacy was mindful of something barely remembered nowadays, namely how the Old English-led conversion of the Germans was a major tipping point in the rise of Western Civilization.  Hitherto Europe/ Christendom/ whatever you call the Western form of civilization had been chugging along within the geographical footprint of the Former Roman Empire, more or less.  And since the armed expansion of Islam ( whoops! I mean, of some Scandinavian nationals with mental-health issues who only turned asylum-seeking into a contact sport so as to enrich our culture for us) doesn’t really get under way until the eighth century, the first big change to this was the Old English-led conversion of the Germans.  The pope thought of creating a ‘Holy See of the North’ because he feared that sheer distance would deter German converts from making pilgrimages to Rome. This accounts for what may seem the strange haste with which the nascent German church created saints, established shrines for pilgrims and why St Boniface’s shrine at Fulda may have been modelled, quite intentionally, on the-then St Peter’s Basilica in Rome.

One of the first things I remember reading about the Old English was that leaving out their missionary effort in Germany would be like writing a history of Victorian Britain with no mention of India.  Now in the light of my current research I’m beginning to see why.  This may be a point worth labouring when dealing with the “smelly grunts in mud huts” mentality because that is emphatically not how the Old English are remembered in modern Germany.  Of which an Englishman has been the patron saint for centuries.  For from St Boniface down the Germans remember the Old English as bringers of civilization and literary culture, since German history begins with the monasteries they ( or we) founded there.  Written German begins with the Vocabularius Sancti Galli, “generally interpreted as being the handbook of an Anglo-Saxon missionary”, because that gives Old English-Old High German glosses.  When the first German monks and nuns began writing their own records ( often in styles so closely modelled on Old English ones, scholars cannot easily tell the difference) this is the historical debut of Germans speaking for themselves and giving their own point of view to things, on German soil.  And all the time this is, as I’ve said, precipitating a phase change in what kind of a thing Western Civilization is. Never again could the West be some run-down relic improvising its own survival in the ruins of the Roman Reich.  Now we had turned a corner well enough to be making something of ourselves, in our own right, once more. 

And our Old English did it.

A point, as I say, worth labouring.



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The moral right of the author to be identified making Britain great again has been asserted.
 

Bowerthane

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2017, 01:28:58 PM »
Well, sharing my creative crisis with the world has developed my thinking.  What about Bobminster and/ or Abbots Trebford as English synonyms that the monastery at Bobbio could have picked up, as generations of Old English pilgrims poddled their way back and forth?




Also, I forgot to mention Mondsee Abbey, named after the nearby lake up in the Austrian Alps overlooked by the Drachenbergs, beneath which Sigward slew Fafnir. 

Mondsee means ‘Lake of the Moon’ in German.  Now disbelievers may scoff, but it’s a hard fact that paragraph nineteen of Wonders of the East speaks of “another place in which there are foreign men” and how “two lakes are there, one the sun’s, the other the moon’s. That which is the sun’s is hot by day and cold by night. And that which is the moon’s is hot by night and cold by day.”  I have failed to find any connection or any special reason why there should be one, so this may be mere co-incidence.  Yet I note it here in case others have anything to add. 

Mondsee Abbey was not founded by an Old English missionary but by one Odilo, duke of Bavaria, and some monks from Monte Cassino in AD 748.  Yet the germanic Kulturkreis was, frankly, crawling with Old English influence at this time and for generations afterwards.  Somewhere between AD 741-2 Saint Boniface had founded the bishoprics of Würzburg, Erfurt and Büraburg ( though Erfurt survived only as a monastery and Büraburg drops off the radar entirely), the siblings Willibald, Wynnebald and Walpurga “worked closely with Boniface in Hesse” and Willibald became bishop of Eichstätt.  Three Mercians, Lull, Burchard and Denehard definitely became archbishop of Fulda, bishop of Würzburg, and acted as a courier to England, respectively.  Then “notably Fulda, Frizlar, Tauberbischofsheim, Ochsenfurt, Hersfeld, Karlburg and Holzkirchen, were established in these regions, staffed with Englishmen and women, who came out to assist Boniface, as well as native Franks, Bavarians and Thuringians ( Map 3)” I have here.  “Mainz, Echternach, Werden, Fulda, Hersfeld and Würzburg used the Insular scripts of Anglo-Saxon missionaries” according to Germany in the Early Middle Ages 800-1056 by T. Reuters and the “monasteries of Stafelsee, Freising, Tegernsee, St Emmeram at Regensburg, Salzburg and Mondsee followed Insular scribal practices” such that “Anglo-Saxon runes were used for W and TH” and “Anglo-Saxon book riddles were copied widely on the Continent.”
   “It is well known that numerous Carolingian manuscripts of the ninth and tenth centuries preserve what are called ‘Insular symptoms’ which betray copying from an Insular exemplar” which led to a lot of “garbled Old English”, seemingly. Lioba may have been from Wessex and she “became abbess of Tauberbischofsheim” in Hesse-Thuringia, other monasteries established here by the Old English being Hersfeld again, Amorbach, Weissenberg “and others”.
   Scribes at Fulda, it says, “continued to write Anglo-Saxon minuscule script into the second and third decade of the ninth century, after Caroline miniscule had prevailed elsewhere.”  And I could go on about how Echternach, Mainz, Werden and Fulda were major “Anglo-Saxon centres on the Continent” but I think you’re getting the idea.  But for the Viking incursions we’d have had ’em playing cricket by King Alfred’s day.

I’m under the impression that Wonders of the East is the proto-bestiary and enjoyed a certain amount of currency in literate circles in our period, so it needn’t raise any eyebrows that East Frankish monks knew of its contents.


Also you may wish to google up the Fraubillen Cross/ Fraubillenkreuz up in Germany’s Eifel Mountains.  This is or was a menhir the upper half of which has been carven into a crucifix by, traditionally, Willibald of Mercia.

It certainly seems in character for an Old English missionary.  One wonders whether this was a one-off initiative, or whether the carver was working within some established, general idea?  Did some Old English stone crosses we know - Ruthwell why not? – begin as menhirs of Heathen significance, or that somebody like St Augustine, St Chad or St Beren just thought they looked too idolatrous by half?

Can tests be done on the stone, I wonder?  If my geography serves menhirs may originate as “glacial erratics” or something, meaning that they were left behind by retreating glaciers in areas where they don’t fit in with the geology around them.





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 The moral right of the author to be identified as a water-cooler sensation has been asserted.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2017, 02:33:22 PM by Bowerthane »

Eanflaed

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2017, 09:24:01 AM »
Firstly, Bowerthane, I think Abbots Trebford works best - gets rid of any potential "Bob" jokes :)


Secondly, all your research about the AS part in the conversion of Western Europe is amazing - I knew a bit about it but not how huge an impact it really had. The whole story needs to be much better known in this country. I wonder if it was suppressed by the "civilising" Normans... It also explains why Germans in general seem to be friendly towards us!


Would you consider writing a serious, but accessible to everyone, history of St Boniface et al? I'd certainly buy it!

Bowerthane

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2017, 02:49:25 PM »
____________________________
I think Abbots Trebford works best
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Thankyou Eanflaed.  Abbots Trebford it is.  Half the problem with writing this book is it becomes an ever more solitary undertaking.  Even without the risk of boring the poo out of one’s nearest and dearest, most of whom know little about pre-Conquest history anyway, there’s all the plot-development problems and interpersonal developments that, sooner or later, end up taking too much explaining.  If only I had a ‘book buddy’, as the Americans call it…

Yet in this instance I hoped it just needed a fresh pair of eyes because, believe me, you can get too wrapped up your creative conundrums and go blind to the stark, staring obvious in this game.


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Would you consider writing a serious... history of St Boniface et al?
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Ah, I fear you’ve answered your own question by celebrating all this “amazing” research that I do.  Which is, believe me, commonly more fun and interesting than all this bleedin’ writing.  I’m sure Alan Furst is on record somewhere saying he wished he could get paid for just researching, and warning budding writers of the dangers of enjoying it too much.  It was Mark Twain who defined application in creative writing as “the application of the seat of the trousers to the seat of the chair”, viz you do have to discipline yourself to Sit Down And Get On With It.

Or to spit it out, I’ll be lucky to get this kiddies’ book finished within another three/ six/ God-knows-how-many years I’ve been pegging away at it, without daring to think of any other writing projects. That quietly miraculous feeling has descended on me again because I’ve reminded myself I finished those two funny short stories I uploaded on this discussion forum.   

Or at least I hope my fellow ġesíþas found them funny.  I’ve since spotted two consistency errors in Can We Have Our Ball Back? ( by the way) and still nobody’s picked me up about them, so I suppose you must have been having too much fun…  :D .


 


Eanflaed

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2017, 07:49:41 PM »
One can get so engrossed that one enters the author's world so only notices what he notices ;D . Or alternatively, this "one" may be too dozy to spot errors!!! Or assumes they are deliberate! Give me (us) a synopsis of your book then I'll try to be your book buddy/devils advocate!

Bowerthane

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2017, 02:37:21 PM »
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Give me (us) a synopsis of your book
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Crumbs Eanflaed, there’s people who’ll warn you about encouraging me.  Also I’m afraid to get too selfish popping up on this forum looking for help with it.  Since I have your email address, I could send you some excerpts to critique, with enough background for them to make sense – but believe me, nothing to do with that book of mine happens quickly. 






Eanflaed

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2017, 11:32:03 PM »
Go on then, I'm up for it :) . It might take a while for me to get through whatever you send though!

Bowerthane

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2017, 01:25:00 PM »
How would you rate Pullman’s version of the Brothers Grimm, Phyllis?

( And how's it going, Eanflaed?)

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Eanflaed

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Re: The Name on the Rose
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2017, 11:57:33 PM »
Only just started I'm afraid - have had visitors all week. But will concentrate on it this weekend :) Just for starters though, have you already explained some of the terms previously in the chapter or are you letting your readers work them out for themselves?