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Nine Worlds in Norse Mythology

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Author Topic: Nine Worlds in Norse Mythology  (Read 2402 times)

Eanflaed

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Re: Nine Worlds in Norse Mythology
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2016, 02:26:05 PM »
Meandering again...could the number 9 be significant just because it is three threes - and 3 seems to be a sacred number in so many cultures? Repeating the sacred number three times could be powerful magic.

Bowerthane

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Re: Nine Worlds in Norse Mythology
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2019, 03:02:48 PM »
Here’s a funny thing.  The other day I was filling an idle hour catching up on the science news webpages of the Richard Dawkins Foundation.  There I came upon a report about ‘moonmoons’ or submoons or whatever astrophysicists end up calling them. Either way these are satellites of satellites and, whilst none are known to science right now, according to a Carnegie Institute scientist two moons of Saturn, one of Jupiter and our own Moon, may have had moons of their own.

Now, disbelievers may scoff and true believers may nibble politely, but it’s a hard fact that our Moon was hit by something or other early in 734 AD because, according to the Winchester copy of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Old English monks there saw the Moon go red round about lauds and, according to seismological information gained through the Apollo landings, we know the Moon “rang like a bell” somewhere about that time.  Will China’s latest lunar probe identify the crater it made, we may wonder?

What caused this moonquake was assumed to be something akin to the deathrock but, of course, if could have been this submoon making moonfall as Phobos is bound to make Marsfall, as that is in a slow but steadily decaying orbit about Mars.

The other thing is that the identification of the heavenly body Tīw with the planet Mars is only an educated guess.  Since another heavenly body, an asteroid 2002 AA29 was in earth orbit during the Early Saxon Period, but has long since slipped the surly bounds of Earth’s gravity to go a’roving about the sun again for another two and a half millennia, I wondered if that was Tīw.

Only now it could have been a... a moon of the Moon....


( Or not!)


The other funny thing is that the Moon... may not be. It's really an insect.  For my kiddies’ book I have been refreshing and extending my astronomical knowledge, largely to avoid Lady Ethelflæda looking a numpty in the eyes of modern children.  Thus I stumbled upon a kosher astrophysical case for denying that the Earth-Moon system should be called a planet with a satellite.  This is largely because ( … pencils ready?) the mass of the Moon is by so many magnitudes greater, relative to the mass of the Earth, and the relative masses of both is so small, relative to the relative masses of true satellites to their parent bodies, that the Earth-Moon System ought better be classified as a binary planet.  Bear in mind that our Moon is actually larger than Pluto, the which was demoted to a dwarf planet a number of years ago.  Indeed, strictly speaking the Moon does not orbit the Earth; both orbit an imaginary point off-centre from the centre of the Earth, because our Moon is pretty unique in having the heft to do that to its parent body too, as it is in other ways.  It’s not strictly true that water always finds the most direct way down here on Earth for instance, because the Moon’s gravity raises the ground as well as the sea as it goes over, and IIRC the Congo was named as an example of a river whose course this distorts.  Another consequence of this is that, whilst mussels may seem to open and close in response to the tide, they actually do so in response to the Moon’s pull.  When shipped inland alive in barrels and buckets, this would be a science-friendly observation the Old English would be in a position to make.  Another account referred to the Moon as “the Earth’s seventh continent” so bloody a nuisance does it make of itself, down here  ::)  ...   


Of course there’s a case against a binary planet classification too.  Yet the issue holds out the fascinating possibility that Mankind may have landed on another planet already, because if so that’s what Neil Armstrong stepped on back on 26th July, 1969.




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« Last Edit: January 14, 2019, 04:01:12 PM by Bowerthane »

Eanflaed

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Re: Nine Worlds in Norse Mythology
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2019, 10:03:54 PM »
Wow Bowerthane, there’s some food for the mind!! I’ll have to reread that a few times! The only thing I’m not sure about is your date of the 1969 moon landing - I thought it was 21st July, my Dad’s birthday...

Bowerthane

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Re: Nine Worlds in Norse Mythology
« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2019, 03:29:26 PM »
Whoops, says here July 20th for the landing.  The 26th July seems to be the splashdown date, back on earth.


Thanks Jenny.