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Author Topic: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers  (Read 3386 times)

Brian Murrell

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Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« on: October 15, 2010, 03:56:46 PM »

Having a chat in the pub the other night we tried to come up with a list of pubs and beers with a name related to the Anglo-Saxon period. The ones we came up with were--

Pubs; The Anglo-Saxon Kings, Kingston Surrey, now demolished; Anglo-Saxon, Gillingham Kent, status unknown; King Ethelbert, Reculver Kent, open; Saxon Chief, Maidstone Kent, status unknown.

Beers; Saxon Archer, might be from Wiltshire; King Alfred, might be from Hampshire and The Hoard brewed in the Midlands and named after the Staffordshire hoard.

These are the only ones we could think of. There must be more around the country?

Brian 

peter horn

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2010, 04:16:52 PM »
King Alfred - winchester, southhampton,Burrowbridge somerset,
King Alfred's Head - wantage oxfordshire

King Harold - Harold wood essex, leyton london,

King Harold's head - Nazing essex

I seem to remember a "Hengist's Head' ?
peter
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Linden

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2010, 11:02:41 PM »
Pubs:-

The Saxon   Weeting Norfolk

The Saxon  Cheswick Green Solihull

The Saxon Mill  Guys Cliffe  Warwick

The Saxon Arms   Stratton Dorset

The Saxon Shore  Herne Bay  Kent

The Saxon Inn  Calmore  Southampton

The Saxon Inn  Child Okeford  Dorset


Breweries:-

Beowulf Brewery  Brownhills Staffordshire - beers include "Beorma"

Valhalla Brewery   Shetland
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John Nicholas Cross

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2010, 07:03:30 AM »
I believe I've drunk "Offa's Ale(or Mead)" in the past and I think there's an hotel or pub named "The King Offa", somewhere near the north Welsh coast, around the Rhyl, Rhuddlan or Prestatyn area.   John.

Ælfsige wiðgongel

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2010, 11:29:48 AM »
My local pub in Alfreton used to be called "The King Alfred", but in the 90's some bright spark changed its name to "Ye Old MacDonald's Farm "

After a brewery rethink, it's about to have its name changed to.... The King Alfred"

so that's one other to add to the list...
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Iohannes

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2010, 08:27:19 AM »
Are there any Anglo-Saxon pubs in central London or in the suburbs within Tube reach?

Linden

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2010, 07:17:22 PM »
Are there any Anglo-Saxon pubs in central London or in the suburbs within Tube reach?

I don't think that there are any pubs that claim a history back that far - the "Prospect of Whitby" at Wapping is quite old but, I think, can only be traced back to about 15th/16th C.   If you are planning to travel out of London as far as Waltham Abbey - you get the benefit of a site of Anglo-Saxon interest plus a nice pub called the Welsh Harp at the Lychgate entrance.  How old it is - I have no idea but I have been told that the beer is quite good.

Are you planning to come to London? - it would be nice to meet up if you do and you have time. 
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Iohannes

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2010, 10:54:48 PM »
Sorry, Linden; I'm afraid I didn't make myself clear enough. By Anglo-Saxon pubs I didn't mean pubs dating back to the ASJF age - I know the oldest public houses date back to approximately the 15th c - but establishments with ASJF names, or related to ASJF history/culture, or even fitted like ASFJ places, e g like a meadhall.

I'm not planning to come to London in the short term. But, when I do, I'll let you know and I'll be very glad to meet you.

All the best

Linden

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2010, 11:21:03 PM »
.......................... - but establishments with ASJF names, or related to ASJF history/culture, or even fitted like ASFJ places, e g like a meadhall.

Can't think of any.  Something ressembling a meadhall would be great but even ASJF names seem to be a bit thin on the ground.  There used to be a "Saxon Horn" pub in Rainham but - apart from the name - I know nothing about it and it's probably either closed by now, renamed or turned into an eating house.
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Brian Murrell

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2010, 03:38:08 PM »
Are there any Anglo-Saxon pubs in central London or in the suburbs within Tube reach?

The only pub with a Anglo-Saxon related name in the London area I know of if the 'King Harold' at Harold Wood train station, near Romford.

There is a blue plaque at the juntion of Fleet St and Chancery Lane marking the spot where 'The Devil & St Dunstan' tavern once stood, demolished about 1778.

Oldest pubs in England, Ye Olde Fighting Cock at St Albans, was originally the dovecote of St Albans Abbey but the foundations date from 793 and is recorded in the Guinness Book of Records. There is a more modern pub at St Albans called the 'King Offa'. The Old Ferry Boat, Holywell near St Ives Cambridgeshire claim to date back to Anglo-Saxon times. Apparently there is a document which records that alcohole was sold here in 560, the foundations are believe to be a century older.

Brian

Brian Murrell

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2011, 12:05:45 PM »
Special brew for the Hoard

http://www.northstaffordshire.co.uk/?p=4362

Brian

Jayson

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2011, 10:17:05 AM »
---I was watching a TV programme the other night which featured  a pub called The Green Dragon.    I wonder whether there is a pub anywhere called The White Dragon?   Anyone know?
Wessex Woman

cenwulf

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #12 on: June 13, 2011, 04:01:27 PM »
---I was watching a TV programme the other night which featured  a pub called The Green Dragon.    I wonder whether there is a pub anywhere called The White Dragon?   Anyone know?

Apparently not:
"The Red Dragon is rare, however, though is not confined to Wales but there appear to be no White Dragons!"

though I did find a White Dragon Noodle Bar if you're feeling peckish.

Linden

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2011, 05:32:04 PM »
---I was watching a TV programme the other night which featured  a pub called The Green Dragon.    I wonder whether there is a pub anywhere called The White Dragon?   Anyone know?

There are several pubs called just "the Dragon". There is a pub called "The Dragon" at Colgate in West Sussex.  As it it supposed to be named after a locally resident dragon, it should be an English dragon.
Perhaps, as the English dragon was white, it was not thought necessary to include the colour in the name? :-\
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Bowerthane

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Pubs and Beers
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2011, 07:11:05 PM »
Hoping to be wrong, I've just googled to find that the Flying Monk pub in Malmesbury no longer exists.  It's still had a ruddy supermarket built on it.

Supposedly the Flying Monk pub was built where Brother Ailmer/ Elmer/ some other spelling, a real Old English monk who predicted the return of Halley's Comet, landed in some Heath Robinson hang-glider-cum-kite contraption.  Having jumped off an eighty-foot monastery tower to test the story of Icarus.  According to William of Malmesbury anyway, breaking both his ankles and forbidden by his abbot to try again when he, Brother Elmer, thought he should have added a tail.

There is, however, a rock group:

www.flyingmonkband.com


Only I've found 'Elmer the Flying Monk' it a good yarn with which to ensnare unsuspecting folk into finding our historical period interesting.  That and, since William of Malmesbury's account seems authentic, because dear old Brother Elmer deserves more credit for making ( and daring!) mankind's earliest known attempt at heavier-than-air flight.

www.eilmer.co.uk
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eilmer_of_Malmesbury


If memory serves, the old pub's site is a couple of hundred yards from the base of the tower, suggesting that Brother Elmer's hang-glider-cum-kite thingie had some genuine aerodymanic qualities.  Along with the fact that he didn't kill himself plunging straight down, just gave himself a classic ski-jumper's injury.

I wonder how much of the "farmers in mud huts" and "civilised by the Normans" attitude we'd have to listen to had the Old English invented the hang-glider a thousand years before Sir George Cayley's coachman first took to the air, in Hanoverian times?

Invented by a Benedictine monk scientific enough to calculate the return of a comet.