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Beowulf authorship

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Author Topic: Beowulf authorship  (Read 3625 times)

David

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Eanflaed

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Re: Beowulf authorship
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2019, 09:36:48 AM »
David, I’ve copied your link to our Facebook page - hope you don’t mind, but I think our followers will like it! (For those of you on Facebook, check out Anglo-Saxon History in Yorkshire. It’s not just about Yorkshire by any means!).

David

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Re: Beowulf authorship
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2019, 11:41:25 AM »
Eanflaed, I lifted it from Facebook.

Eanflaed

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Re: Beowulf authorship
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2019, 11:33:39 PM »
But not from our page? It’s certainly been popular today - 199 “likes” and it’s been shared 185 times, that’s pretty good!

SeDweorh

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Re: Beowulf authorship
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2019, 10:21:15 AM »
Finally had chance to glance over the actual paper and not just the 'glossy'. Turns out that it is a continuation of/builds upon  Drout's Lexomics so I have deleted my original comment. It is a serious study after all , once one gets past the click bait headline .  I would have picked up on the name 'Neidorf'. if it had been mentioned in the glossy (did I miss it?) , bit unfair to not quote/credit the guy I feel ....and leaves any reader who knows even a little bit about the subject wondering why a "post-doc" in "evolutionary dynamics " (even one from Havard) thinks......
« Last Edit: June 27, 2019, 10:29:39 AM by SeDweorh »
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Bowerthane

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Re: Beowulf authorship
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2019, 02:33:39 PM »
Thanks David.  I hope this suggestive computer-work does not swing Beowulf scholarship too far the other way.  I’ve always believed that Beowulf-as-we-know-it is the creation of a single artist, but equally I never doubted he edited in/ spun/ was inspired by etc. other, traditional material that suited his purpose, as Homer seems to have done with the Catalogue of Ships, Milton with the Old English Genesis, Barry Manilow with his rhyming dictionary, Jeremy Corbyn with the Horst-Wessel-Lied etc.  I feel sure there was an oral Ur-Beowulf sung, quite possibly, as far back as the Sutton Hoo era.

Do other ġesīþas find this sort of thing interesting in a general way?  If memory serves, it was this kind of computer-based stylometry that found that the Gospel of Mark bore stylistic similarities with certain esoteric works known to have originated in Alexandria in the first to second centuries AD.  This breathed life back into a medieval Christian tradition, all but forgotten by modern Christians, that the Gospel of Mark was written ( or at least reached more or less the form in which we know it) in Alexandria.  What was believed to be the tomb of the apostle Mark was once a place of pilgrimage in Alexandria where the Visigothic noblewoman, Egeria, visited it early in our period.

I wonder whether computer-based stylometry can settle a suspicion, long developed amongst classical philologists, that the parts of Ptolemy’s Almagest concerning the epicycles may have been edited in from lost works by Hypatia of Alexandria.  She was one of the last great Pagan philosophers, especially as a Maths wizard who taught Maths to the future Pope Zosimus when our Anglo-Saxon forbears were building wattle-and-daub dwellings up the Thames Valley. Conics is the name of one of her lost works, otherwise unknown but for the fact that, by output or flair, she seems to have excelled at geometry.  Epicycles are the orbits-about-orbits you have to plot if you will insist on reconciling an Earth-centred solar system with the apparent motions of the planets ( like, Mars loses interest and goes backwards for a while at one point; so if you prefer it to the Harvest Star or Ruddish, you could call it the Widderstar or Widderworld if you wanted an English-sounding name for the planet Mars). When I last read anything about it, plain-old stylistic analysis had found that the sections of the Almagest dealing with the epicycles had similarities to one another they did not share with the rest of the text, giving rise to Hypatia as the number-one suspect for whose work Claudius Ptolemy had leaned on, directly or indirectly.

It would be nice if a lost work by Hypatia could to any extent be jigsawed back together.

Nice what the article had to say about Cynewulf, too.


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Or by multiple authors seeking to trick the analysis into thinking it was written by a single author

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Now why is that so faintly amusing?




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