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Author Topic: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller  (Read 108 times)

Phyllis

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Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« on: February 16, 2021, 11:53:10 AM »
Well, we have been stuck at home a while now, but no doubt hope to be able to travel soon, and break out the "holiday Spanish" phrase book, or whichever language is appropriate!

But WHAT IF we could travel to Anglo-Saxon England? What phrases might be helpful to the new arrival at a bustling port?

Does anyone want to come up with suggestions to get us started?

I offer:

Hwær is þæt cumena hus?
Where is the inn?

Phyllis

David

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2021, 10:12:35 AM »
Just to add a little you could say
 
Þæt reordhūs    the restaurant
Sēo ċēapstōw   the market place
 
Meaht þū cumena hūs ġerǣdan?  Can you recommend an inn?

Bill

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2021, 02:37:19 AM »
Hi David.  Just a little confused.   My copy of 'On the Threshold of Anglo-Saxon'  (yes 1939 copy) says that 'reord means - speech.   Are you saying that 'reordhus' literally means ' speech house' or speaking house'.   Cheers and regards

David

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2021, 08:55:13 AM »
Reord does mean voice, language and speech as I’ve used it in horsmūð, where it can be feminine or neuter. However, as a purely feminine noun it can also mean food, sustenance and meal. The verb reordian takes both meanings. Usually in compounds and with suffixes it takes the feast meaning as in ġereorddæġ, ġereordnes, ġereordunghūs, ġereordungtīd, reordhūs, and reordung.

Phyllis

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2021, 01:12:24 PM »
might we use "metehus" instead?
Phyllis

David

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2021, 05:16:17 PM »
If you want a phrase book for a modern country that speaks Old English metehūs is fine and there are many other words for food.
 
If you are talking about going back to Anglo-Saxon England it is not so clear. I am sure that metehūs would be understood and might even had been used but I do not think that it is attested whereas reordhūs and reordunghūs are.

Bill

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2021, 11:42:17 PM »
Thanks David......cheers

Phyllis

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2021, 09:34:26 AM »
Thanks David - I hadn't picked up that it was attested!

Here's another possible entry for our guide book:

ic eom seoc! find me læce, ic bidde ðe
I am unwell, please find me a doctor

you never know what they put in the food at the reordhus :)
Phyllis

David

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2021, 04:28:28 PM »
For me the most important entry would be
Spricst þū nīwe englisċ?
Do you speak modern English?