Gegaderung

Gegaderung => Old English Language => Topic started by: David on February 17, 2019, 12:20:35 PM

Title: Feminine nouns
Post by: David on February 17, 2019, 12:20:35 PM
For a long time, I have been worried about the accusative endings in both the singular and the plural of strong feminine nouns. On investigating it looks as though in nearly all the declensions the singular accusative can either have no ending or an -e ending and the nominative and accusative plural can have either an -a ending or an -e ending.

The exceptions are the with i-mutation, so that
Bōc is always bēċ in the accusative singular and the nominative and accusative plurals.
Sweostor usually remains the same in all three cases, although it can have an -a (or rarely a -u) in the nominative and accusative plural.
Dohtor can stay the same in all three cases or it can have an -a ending in the plural.
Mōdor stays the same in the singular but has an -a or -u ending in the plural.
In the plural of sweostor, dohtor and mōdor  the second “o” is normally dropped if there is an ending e.g. dohtra and mōdru.

Can anyone tell us more about this?