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Author Topic: What's Everyone Reading?  (Read 140892 times)

Karen Carlson

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What's Everyone Reading?
« on: June 15, 2010, 03:29:22 AM »
I'm currently reading Wayland's Work by that Pollington fellow, and The Pale Horseman by Bernard Cornwell -- the second in his series of adventure novels set in the time of King Alfred.

Karen
« Last Edit: November 06, 2011, 08:58:57 AM by peter horn »

steve pollington

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2010, 07:59:43 AM »
I'm reading 'Initiation Bewtween Two World: Structure and Symbolism in Pre-Christian Scandinavian Religion' by J.P.Schjodt. It's not a light read but is very detailed in its examination of initiation sequences in some Norse myths and stories.

Godwulf

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2010, 06:06:36 PM »
I'm reading "The English Warrior From Earliest Times Till 1066" by Stephen Pollington.  It's really rather good with lots of comprehensive detail.

I'd recommend it to anyone who wants to understand the warrior class and its function.

Longlocks

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2010, 11:29:45 AM »
I'm re-reading Margaret Gelling & Ann Cole's "The Landscape of Place-names".
Also reading Steve's new book on art, a little bit at a time. Lifting it down from the bookcase every day is providing good aerobic exercise. Perhaps the book should be renamed "Wayland's Work-out?"
 ;D

Jayson

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2010, 01:14:24 AM »
---I've just started 'The Monsters and the Critics and other Essays' by JRR Tolkien which looks as though it's going to be interesting.   The first Essay is on Beowulf and Tolkien doesn't sound too happy about the critics ideas on the poem!  Apart from that, I'm readikng our latest Withowinde, little by little to make it last, and a couple of old fashioned mysteries, one a Marorie Allingham Campion story and the other a recent writer in the same vein named James Anderson.   I like the mental work out to find out exactly Who Dun It.
Wessex Woman

Deorca

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2010, 09:06:01 PM »
Thomas Egenes Introduction to Sanskrit, and my trusty, dog-eared, Cambridge OE reader. Just a bit of light reading...

Bowerthane

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2010, 11:18:16 AM »
Well dig this.  I’m reading England’s Last War Against France by Colin Smith ( ISBN 978-0-7538-2705-5, Phoenix) about our military operations against the Vichy regime.  Which of course has very little to do with the Anglo-Saxons save as a gallicism for what is now called the Anglosphere.  Until just now, that is, when here on folio 146 Smith writes, “the Luftwaffe’s night bombers had visited the English Midlands and flattened twelve of the armaments factories in the old Saxon town of Coventry.”

Anybody venture as guess as to what the blue blazes Smith thinks he’s talking about?

ubique

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2010, 04:40:41 PM »
Just about to start Tacticus Germania the penguin classics edition ive been looking forward to reading this for some time.Just finished fire stike 7/9 (not AS as you might have guessed)  and bloodline by Katy Moran its set in the time of King Penda and an ok read but I would have probably enjoyed it more in my early teens.

Liam

evilerik

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2010, 06:05:36 PM »
Currently reading "1000 years of annoying the French" by Stephen Clarke for a bit of light amusement.

Wulfric

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2010, 08:45:26 AM »
I'm currently reading "Northanhymbre Saga - The History of the Anglo Saxon KIngs Of Northumbria" by John Marsden, although since I started it I've also read Bernard Cornwall's "The Burning Land" and Kathleen Herbert's "Peace-Weavers & Shield-Maidens Women in Early English Society". Unfortunately such entertaining reading is out of necessity giving way to the likes of "Effective Teaching in Schools" and "Essential Teaching Skills". If anyone finds a cure for this "real world" please do let me know.

Jayson

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2010, 05:40:40 PM »
David and I went to West Stow for the 'event' at the end of July (posted elsewhere) and I picked up another of Steve Pollington's works  --  Anglo-Saxon FAQs.   It is really very good, especially if, like DAvid, you are just learning about the era and the people.  I can recommend it as a stocking-filler to give to any relation who still thinks the A-S live in mud huts (as my hairdresser said today!).
Wessex Woman

leofwin

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2010, 06:53:36 PM »
Just finished 'Lordship and Military Obligation in AS England'. Had to look up words like 'allodial', struggled with some of the Latin, but a serious good read nevertheless. It strikes me that if you ask a dozen historians to define 'sake' and 'soke', or 'hide', or 'ceorl', you'll get at least fifteen different replies.

also David cowells' 'How we would have spoken if we'd won in 1066. V original and entertaining!

Bowerthane

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #12 on: September 22, 2010, 07:21:01 PM »
Well I’m reading David Rollason’s Northumbria, 500-11000, Creation and Destruction of a Kingdom ( ISBN 0-521-81335-2, CUP 2003), Chris Wickham’s The Inheritance of Rome, A History of Europe from 400 to 1000 ( ISBN 978-0-140-29014-1, Penguin 2009) and for fiction I expect to read Ross Laidlaw’s Theoderic ( ISBN 978-1-84697-111-2, Polygon 2008) though I should be grateful for opinions on it.  I read his Attila or tried to, and wasn’t very impressed. 

Also I’m re-reading Mr Pollington’s The English Warrior ( ISBN 1-898281-42-4, Anglo-Saxon Books 1996) and The Warrior’s Way ( ISBN 0-7137-2120-0, Blandford Press 1989) as I’m growing alarmed at the number of basic and simple things I seem to have forgotten, diving in at the deep end to research that kiddies’ book I’m writing. 

Like, the Old English sodding-well-did have trousers…




Jayson

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2010, 04:23:47 PM »
----slightly off-topic but about those trousers...that was one thing which really surprised me when I went to West Stow this July and was told by that lovely weaver (can't remember his name, sorry) that the A-S wore trousers like the ones he was wearing.   Another thing was those floor-boards...

Is there any book about house-building in A-S times?
Wessex Woman

peter horn

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2010, 02:23:52 PM »
----slightly off-topic but about those trousers...that was one thing which really surprised me when I went to West Stow this July and was told by that lovely weaver (can't remember his name, sorry) that the A-S wore trousers like the ones he was wearing.   Another thing was those floor-boards...

Is there any book about house-building in A-S times?

I think you would have been much more surprised if he had worn no trousers. The Germanic folk were more noted for trousers than the Greeks & Romans. Im not sure what your query is regarding the floor boards. My opinion is that the AS would have made a better job, but we must not complain about the work of volunteers.
An AS manuel on housebuilding would save a lot of time. No need then for all those experimental buildings.
Peter