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Author Topic: Beowulf and Grendel - the early years  (Read 15042 times)

Michael Æðeling

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Re: Beowulf and Grendel - the early years
« Reply #15 on: August 27, 2015, 12:17:26 AM »
I have a newbie question:

Is there much difference in meaning between "sægde Beowulf" and "cwæð Beowulf"?

In Atherton´s 'Teach yourself Old English', he relates the story of Joesph using the latter. To my eye, sægde looks more like modern German sagde, but I´m not sure which one might have been more likely in the C10-C11 era.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2015, 12:30:27 AM by Æðeling »

David

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Re: Beowulf and Grendel - the early years
« Reply #16 on: August 27, 2015, 08:11:47 AM »
 
 
I have a newbie question:

Is there much difference in meaning between "sægde Beowulf" and "cwæð Beowulf"?

In Atherton´s 'Teach yourself Old English', he relates the story of Joesph using the latter. To my eye, sægde looks more like modern German sagde, but I´m not sure which one might have been more likely in the C10-C11 era.


I do not know of any difference between cwæð and sæġde. However cwæð seems to be more common. I think that Phyllis used sæġde more often because she was trying to make it easier for non-englisc speakers.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2015, 08:15:03 AM by David »

Ceawlin

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Re: Beowulf and Grendel - the early years
« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2016, 01:22:00 PM »
I loved this, I liked that you substituted the names for Beowulf and Grendal!
Agreed.

Eanflaed

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Re: Beowulf and Grendel - the early years
« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2016, 12:31:18 PM »

I was not so keen on this one but I think that you have done very well with the translation.  Firstly I found it unsettling that you used Beowulf and Grendel. Why Beowulf instead of Beornheard? For monster I would use aglæca


You will probably clobber me next time I see you Phyllis, but I'm afraid I agree with David on that one! It could be confusing for the audience. Plus you could do a child-friendly précis of Beowulf one day!

Phyllis

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Re: Beowulf and Grendel - the early years
« Reply #19 on: February 21, 2016, 02:48:12 PM »

You will probably clobber me next time I see you Phyllis, but I'm afraid I agree with David on that one! It could be confusing for the audience. Plus you could do a child-friendly précis of Beowulf one day!

Not to worry - the final version is fully Beowulf and Grendel free! I am not too fussed either way and leave it up to people to do as they prefer. I have read it as Beornheard and se aglæca more often than not when practising and that's what's on the download page now :)

In terms of permission the publisher has confirmed we can share this (with attribution) as an "official" translation and have sent a copy to David McKee so he is aware. I love David McKee in a total fan-girl way so this makes me very happy.

The official download is on the relevant page of our website -

http://www.tha-engliscan-gesithas.org.uk/education/old-english-translation-of-a-childrens-tale

I also recorded it out loud so people not familiar with the language can hear it.

Apologies in advance for my pronunciation. If anyone can do better please feel free!
 


Phyllis

David

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Re: Beowulf and Grendel - the early years
« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2016, 03:51:03 PM »
 
Phyllis has put together a very good section in her link. Normally to get to it you would click on site map on the home page. There are many other treasures hidden away there too.
 
However there are a couple of errors in the final version. In section 5 you have “Se aglæca is in þæm wyrtegearde and he will me etan, sægde Beornheard”; “will” should be “wile”.
In section 11 you have “ROR, cwæþ se aglæca æthinden Beornheardes modor”; “modor” should be “meder” as I believe that æhinden always goes with the dative.
 
Finally “in” can go with accusative as well as the dative. I would agree with the dative in section 5 but would have gone with the accusative in sections 7 and 10.