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Author Topic: What's Everyone Reading?  (Read 140893 times)

Eanflaed

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #225 on: July 29, 2021, 12:34:33 PM »
Hi Bill, I’ve been considering buying that book - would you recommend it? I must admit I do favour Michael Wood’s theory at the moment (but am open to other suggestions) because the Great North Road had been a conduit for the movement of armies since the Roman period and so many battles have been fought on or near it. It would be the obvious route for Athelstan to get into the North quickly and if York was the target it reinforces the sense of a confrontation in Yorkshire rather than Cheshire. I can’t see why Constantine would channel his army so far west when Athelstan would be approaching from the south...but then I haven’t read “Never greater slaughter”!

Phyllis

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #226 on: July 29, 2021, 04:08:00 PM »
I did write a review for the next WW if our esteemed editor feels it is worthy...

It was excellent and gave me a different view.
Phyllis

Bill

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #227 on: July 31, 2021, 03:01:24 AM »
Thanks for posts Phyllis and Eanflaed.   Yes I recommend the book Eanflaed.   I must admit it took me a while to get over the fact that it was written by an American, kept trying to put that to the back of my mind as it has been really well researched and Michael Livingston says in the book that he has been the subject of adverse comment owing to that fact.   To me his arguments and reasoning are compelling (yes I know I am writing from the other side of the world but have travelled to the UK enough to have a reasonable idea of the lie of the land).   He completes the book by outlining all the other contending sites and giving the reasons why they fade in comparison to the Wirrell.   If noting else it is a basis for much  further debate.   Regards to you all.

Mearcstapa

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #228 on: August 27, 2021, 03:20:46 PM »
I've nearly finished Max Adam's 'The Last Kingdom' it's quite a long walk through the wavering marshes of the post-roman period and the beginning of the first Anglo Saxon kingdoms but worth reading for Mr Adam's has managed to synthesize together a lot of different information about this shadowy era and put it into an interesting, grounded narrative. You get the sense of the centuries 400-600ish being very dynamic for the communities living in Britain as they adapt to whatever comes next, and there being lots of possible kingdoms that never made it. Adam's talks about some very interesting things around the land and how the first kingdoms were organised around peripatetic kings with their followers who required special farms 'regia villae' within their territory to host them for a few months before moving on to the next. When it comes down to it all all these kingdoms could only exist with a peasant class who spent their days provisioning food, fuel and cloth for their lords. 

geoff littlejohns

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #229 on: April 13, 2022, 09:33:40 PM »
I am reading 'Empires and Barbarians' by Peter Heather.  I have only just discovered this, apparently eminent, historian.  I am impressed by the good sense and judgement of what I am reading.
The book was published as long ago as 2009 and so Peter Heather has been writing for quite some years without me coming across his work before.  Although writing about northern Europe as a whole, his ideas have relevance to the Anglo-Saxon experience.
So I am wondering whether other gesithas have manged to be more up-to-date than I have and have already read & digested Peter Heather's arguments.  I would be interested to find out how influential he has become.