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Author Topic: What's Everyone Reading?  (Read 143000 times)

Bowerthane

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #210 on: December 28, 2020, 04:12:13 PM »
This is from Book of Fire by Brian Moynahan, subtitled William Tyndale, Thomas More and the Bloody Birth of the English Bible ( 2002 Hachette, ISBN 978-0-7481-2577-7):
 
The earliest Old English translations to survive were made by Caedmon, a seventh-century monk at Whitby and a former cowherd who had felt a divine urge to learn to read and write. ‘He sang of the world’s creation, the origins of the human race, and all the story of Genesis,’ the scholar and theologian the Venerable Bede wrote of Caedmon; ‘he sang of Israel’s exodus from Egypt and entry into the Promised Land…’ An Anglo-Saxon translation of the gospels made from the Vetus Italica, the pre-Vulgate Latin Bible, was said to be the work of Bede himself. His student Cuthbert described how the great scholar completed his work on St John’s gospel on his deathbed in the monastery at Jarrow in May 735. ‘In the evening, his pupil said, Dear Master, one sentence is still wanting,’ Cuthbert recalled. ‘Write it quickly, exclaimed Bede. When it was finished… he repeated the Gloria Patria, and expired in the effort.’ Passages from Exodus and the first fifty psalms were translated into Anglo-Saxon in the ninth century, perhaps by the pious King Alfred. A section of Genesis was worked on by the grammarian abbot Aelfric in the late tenth century. An anonymous scholar translated the four gospels into West Saxon.
 
Well, that’s the first I’ve heard of any rendering all four gospels into any kind of Old English.  Has anyone the advantage of me, or has Moynahan got his facts wrong?


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The moral right of the author to identify William Tyndale as Alfred the Second has been asserted.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2020, 04:17:01 PM by Bowerthane »

Phyllis

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #211 on: January 02, 2021, 04:16:53 PM »
I'm not quite sure I read it that way? I think it says Cædmon created poems based on various biblical stories from Genesis and Exodus, and that Bede translated the gospels (although only mentions John here and Bede only says he translated parts and "explained" others), and that an anonymous scholar translated all 4 for the Wessex bible.

Phyllis

wulfgar2

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #212 on: January 11, 2021, 05:41:05 PM »
There are several copies of the translation of the four Gospels into Old English dating from the XI century onwards. A comprehensive edition of the earliest version of them CCCC 140 can be found in 'The Old English Version of the Gospels' by R.M. Liuzza Vols I and II published by The Early English Text Society. Have a good read.


 

Bowerthane

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #213 on: January 11, 2021, 07:50:04 PM »
Thanks Wulfgar and Phyllis.  You are quite right, there's definitely translations of all four by the Late Saxon Period.


Now I'm annoyed that none of this was mentioned in any of my other reading.  I've been whiling away lockdown reading a biography of Tyndale too, amongst other  ??? relevant tracts and tomes, and as a rule it's only Bede's translation of John that gets mentioned.


All four.  And I didn't know...  >:(








« Last Edit: January 11, 2021, 07:51:51 PM by Bowerthane »

Phyllis

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Phyllis

Bowerthane

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #215 on: January 19, 2021, 10:01:52 AM »
Thanks Phyllis, that’s ever so interesting ( and convenient!).  And how’s this for ::)  irony?  I’m also reading Hannah Crawforth’s Etymology and the Invention of English in Early Modern Literature ( 2013 CUP, ISBN 978-1-107-04176-9) and guess what she went and said the other night:

“In 1571 Parker’s scholars had published The Gospels of the Fower Euangelistes Translated in the Olde Saxons Tyme out of Latin into the Vulgare Toung of the Saxons, an attempt to show an Old English precedent for vernacular Bible translation. Foxe’s preface to the work denounces those who argue against a vernacular Bible as doing so ‘contrary… to the euidence of Antiquitie’. He cites translations by Bede, Saint Cuthbert and the Saxon King Alfred as precedent for the reformers’ project to make the Gospels readily available in English: ‘if any shall doubt of the auncient vsage therof, whether they had the Scriptures in their language of old time, here he may haue a proofe of so much translated into our old Englishe tounge’.” 

It never rains but it pours...



« Last Edit: January 19, 2021, 10:03:38 AM by Bowerthane »

Phyllis

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #216 on: January 23, 2021, 09:48:45 AM »
I'm pretty surein the 16th/17th centuries the Catholics argued for the purity and tradition of the Anglo-Saxon Church, and the Protestants for the production of vernacular translation. It's true that Anglo-Saxon studies has soemthing for everyone!
Phyllis

Phyllis

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #217 on: January 31, 2021, 10:56:19 AM »
I'm posting this here because I understand there was a novel...

But what are people's thoughts on The Dig (Netflix)?

I really enjoyed it and got quite a shiver seengn them uncover the ship and find the first objects. It's not a documentary so I was happy enoough with the story telling "wandering" a bit from history, although I did feel Peggy Piggott got a raw deal. The main thing missing for me was the inexplicable failure to  show the artefacts themselves more clearly. I don't mean to make it a showcase for them, but perhaps a closing shot of the display in the British Museum would have helped cement the utter awesomeness of the discovery.

For those not on Netflix, I would recommend it when it is more widely available. And I am pleased to see it generating interest in the press.

Phyllis

Phyllis

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #218 on: February 16, 2021, 11:47:11 AM »
I am reading Max Adams' new book "First Kingdom" about the early part of the period - so far I'm still in the the immediate post-Roman period, but it is very interesting. He has more recent information on current thinking around the economic decline in 4th and 5th century Roman Britain and the survival or not of local communities as they adapted to changing circumstances.
Phyllis

Ælfric

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #219 on: March 08, 2021, 12:13:12 AM »
I'm reading Hild, by Nicola Griffith, and Ishiiguro's The Buried Giant.  I recently read The Wake, Paul, Kingsnorth.  I take Hild to be what is generally called "young adult", meaning "meant for adolescents", lit.  But the setting in the time of Northumbrian conversion to Christianity is interesting, and, as far as I can tell, it's roughly historically right (at least to the extent Bede wrote history).  I take the other to novels to be parables, not really historical novels.  I mildly recommend them all.

Phyllis

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #220 on: March 08, 2021, 09:33:36 AM »
I'm reading Hild, by Nicola Griffith, and Ishiiguro's The Buried Giant

I read The Buried Giant even before I knew there was a somewhat tenuous connection! I liked it a lot but it's not really for the keen Anglo-Saxonist. It was quite odd in that respect, but I do like Ishiguro  ;D
Phyllis

cynewulf

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #221 on: July 03, 2021, 02:40:19 PM »
Has anyone bought the Morris boo on the Anglo-Saxons ? I see it's in the top 10 for hardback non-fiction. Any views ?


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Phyllis

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #222 on: July 10, 2021, 02:14:37 PM »
I have read teh Morris book because I wanted his take on the period. It was a Parson's Egg for me. Of course, it isn't his main period usually, but I was pleased some chapters provided a really good basic overview of current thinking, But then others...oh dear

I'm not sure I'd recommend it even as a starter book to be honest. I'd stick with Nick Higham for that

To be clear, other opinions are available!
Phyllis

Phyllis

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #223 on: July 10, 2021, 02:22:02 PM »
Meanwhile - I am really enjoying RObin Fleming's new book on The Material Fall of Roman Britain, 300-525 CE

THis investiagtes that transtion from what we call Roman to what we call Anglo-Saxon. It talks about the impact of changes in teh materials available for daily life - things like plants, animals, pottery types, metal, stone etc and how the change in availability of these thigns affects daily living. It's not a big book - less than 200 pages - but it's absolutely packed with information and there areover 100 pages of end notes with detaild references to archaeological reports on teh sites and finds discussed. I am absolutely enthralled!

To sum it up, I might say that just as it takes a village to raise a child, so it takes the full might of the Roman infrastructure to make a pot. If any of the links in that supply chain break, then the pot does not happen, or at least it does not happen in the way it used to. And that affects how people cook, how they carry out funerary practices and how they display wealth or status. This then applie across the full range of materials, prodcuts, skills and practices of living.



Phyllis

Bill

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Re: What's Everyone Reading?
« Reply #224 on: July 15, 2021, 11:49:29 PM »
Hi all.  Have recently completed ' Never greater slaughter' - Brunanburgh and the birth of England by Michael Livingston.   Be interested to read others comments  as to the supposed location of the battle especially in light of Jenny's article in summer issue of Withowinde - cheers and regards