Gegaderung > Old English Language

mummy and daddy

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leofwin:
Who will venture to reconstruct some old English - familiar words (forgive the pun) for faeder and modor?

I'm tempted to think that modern English 'Daddy' is a distant echo of child-speak for 'faeder'.

Maybe dada and  moma? dade and mome?

Is there any written evidence in Middle English which may give clues?

What do kids say in modern Danish / Swedish / Dutch?

...or Frisian?

Adrian:
Dutch: mama + papa
German: Mutti + Vati... or papi
Swedish: morsa + farsa or papa
Danish: mor + far
Icelandic: mummia + pabba
Frisian: father + mem

Iohannes:
Hi everyone!

I think a common Frisian equivalent for 'father' is 'heit'.

By the way, what was the Leornungdæg like yesterday? What about your lecture, Adrian?

All the best!   ;)

Linden:

--- Quote from: Iohannes on October 25, 2010, 10:43:28 PM ---............
By the way, what was the Leornungdæg like yesterday? What about your lecture, Adrian?


--- End quote ---

Well I enjoyed the Leornungdæg - I just wish there had been more time for Adrian's talk - just enough to whet the appetite really - he must do some more.

Deorca:
Swedish is actually 'mamma' and 'pappa'. 'Morsa' and 'farsa' are very familiar familiar terms, slang, almost (but not) derisory.

I often find it odd that the Danes stick to the more formal 'mor' and 'far' (literally, mother and father, as in Swedish and Norwegian) and seem to have no shortened/familiar version.

The online etymology dictionary has the following entry for 'dad' -

"recorded from c.1500, but probably much older, from child's speech, nearly universal and probably prehistoric (cf. Welsh tad, Ir. daid, Czech, L., Gk. tata, Lith. tete, Skt. tatah all of the same meaning)"

Jim

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