Gegaderung > Old English Language

Help with Old English...

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Wulfhelm:
I am currently writing some music to do with Beowulf, and I wish the Facebook page for my project to be in Old English. Needless to say, I'm quite useless at writing in Old English ... so if anyone could tell me how to phrase these sentences so they make sense, I would appreciate it. I wish my project's name to be Old English for 'Noble-Runes', which I believe is Æðelruna, but please correct me if I am wrong in this regard.  :D :o

Genre   
Anglisc ærgegliwcræft ond deofolcræft for þæs Angelcynnes hæðenfolce.

Members   
Wulfhelm on eallum geteohum.

Hometown   
Cestrefeld on Angelcynn.

Description   
Ealdum anglisce tilunge ond þeodiscum geleafum Æðelruna mæssereas. To þæt folcland min fæger Angelcynn ond þeod. Se staðolfæst unoferswiðed ethel.

Biography   
2011: Her to Beowulfes ealdgesegene geglenged Wulfhelm soncræfte.



Thank you for any help.  :)

Horsa:
Hello Wulfhelm,
I am an enthusiast rather than an expert. Hopefully one of Gegaderung's resident experts will wander across this.

I have a few grammatical observations to make.

I think it should be
Se staðolfæsta unoferswiðda eðel


What does this mean?
"To þæt folcland min fæger Angelcynn ond þeod"
Is it like a toast, or a battle cry?

Normally 'to' takes the dative.
"To þæm folclande, minum fægeran Angelcynne ond þeode"

Also, what are these words?
"ærgegliwcræft ond deofolcræft"

I would translate them as knowledge of/skill in ancient music and devil knowledge.

Could you give a modern English script from which you are translating?

Wulfhelm:

--- Quote from: Horsa on March 26, 2011, 10:02:46 PM ---I have a few grammatical observations to make.

I think it should be
Se staðolfæsta unoferswiðda eðel
--- End quote ---

Can you tell me why that would be the case?


--- Quote from: Horsa on March 26, 2011, 10:02:46 PM ---What does this mean?
"To þæt folcland min fæger Angelcynn ond þeod"
Is it like a toast, or a battle cry?

Normally 'to' takes the dative.
"To þæm folclande, minum fægeran Angelcynne ond þeode"

--- End quote ---

It is intended as a toast. "To that folk-land; my beauiful England and tribe."


--- Quote from: Horsa on March 26, 2011, 10:02:46 PM ---Also, what are these words?
"ærgegliwcræft ond deofolcræft"

I would translate them as knowledge of/skill in ancient music and devil knowledge.

--- End quote ---

I would prefer a different word than devil-craft, since the meaning I want is more akin to 'pre-Christian heathen'. Perhaps hæðencræft would be better suited? Also, since the music itself is not ancient (I've not even wrote it yet) but evocative of ancient English culture, perhaps there is a way to phrase this that brings that across?


--- Quote from: Horsa on March 26, 2011, 10:02:46 PM ---Could you give a modern English script from which you are translating?

--- End quote ---

I surely can!

Genre   
Anglisc ærgegliwcræft ond deofolcræft for þæs Angelcynnes hæðenfolce.
English music and heathenry for the English heathen-folk.

Perhaps simply Gliwcræft for þæs Angelcynnes hæðenfolce is more suitable?

Members   
Wulfhelm on eallum geteohum.
Wulfhelm on all instruments.

I'm not certain whether geteohum is the best/most suitable word for this meaning.

Hometown   
Cestrefeld on Angelcynn.
Chesterfield in England.

Description   
Ealdum anglisce tilunge ond þeodiscum geleafum Æðelruna mæssereas. To þæt folcland min fæger Angelcynn ond þeod. Se staðolfæst unoferswiðed ethel.
Æðelruna celebrates Old English culture and tribal beliefs. To that folk-land, my beautiful England and tribe. The steadfast, unconquerable homeland.

There must be a less Christian-oriented word for celebrates than mæssereas.

Biography   
2011: Her to Beowulfes ealdgesegene geglenged Wulfhelm soncræfte.
In this year, Wulfhelm composed music to the saga of Beowulf.



Thank you for your help so far, Horsa! :)

leofwin:
hello Wulfhelm!
Yes, your intended meanings in New English might clarify things

Wulfhelm:
Hehe, we must have posted at the same time, Leofwin!  :D

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