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Author Topic: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller  (Read 1990 times)

Phyllis

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Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« on: February 16, 2021, 11:53:10 AM »
Well, we have been stuck at home a while now, but no doubt hope to be able to travel soon, and break out the "holiday Spanish" phrase book, or whichever language is appropriate!

But WHAT IF we could travel to Anglo-Saxon England? What phrases might be helpful to the new arrival at a bustling port?

Does anyone want to come up with suggestions to get us started?

I offer:

Hwær is þæt cumena hus?
Where is the inn?

Phyllis

David

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2021, 10:12:35 AM »
Just to add a little you could say
 
Þæt reordhūs    the restaurant
Sēo ċēapstōw   the market place
 
Meaht þū cumena hūs ġerǣdan?  Can you recommend an inn?

Bill

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2021, 02:37:19 AM »
Hi David.  Just a little confused.   My copy of 'On the Threshold of Anglo-Saxon'  (yes 1939 copy) says that 'reord means - speech.   Are you saying that 'reordhus' literally means ' speech house' or speaking house'.   Cheers and regards

David

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2021, 08:55:13 AM »
Reord does mean voice, language and speech as I’ve used it in horsmūð, where it can be feminine or neuter. However, as a purely feminine noun it can also mean food, sustenance and meal. The verb reordian takes both meanings. Usually in compounds and with suffixes it takes the feast meaning as in ġereorddæġ, ġereordnes, ġereordunghūs, ġereordungtīd, reordhūs, and reordung.

Phyllis

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2021, 01:12:24 PM »
might we use "metehus" instead?
Phyllis

David

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2021, 05:16:17 PM »
If you want a phrase book for a modern country that speaks Old English metehūs is fine and there are many other words for food.
 
If you are talking about going back to Anglo-Saxon England it is not so clear. I am sure that metehūs would be understood and might even had been used but I do not think that it is attested whereas reordhūs and reordunghūs are.

Bill

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2021, 11:42:17 PM »
Thanks David......cheers

Phyllis

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2021, 09:34:26 AM »
Thanks David - I hadn't picked up that it was attested!

Here's another possible entry for our guide book:

ic eom seoc! find me læce, ic bidde ðe
I am unwell, please find me a doctor

you never know what they put in the food at the reordhus :)
Phyllis

David

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2021, 04:28:28 PM »
For me the most important entry would be
Spricst þū nīwe englisċ?
Do you speak modern English?

Phyllis

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2021, 01:37:13 PM »
For me the most important entry would be
Spricst þū nīwe englisċ?
Do you speak modern English?

Oh you so right! Along with "ic ne sprece na Englisc!" I speak no Englisc!
Phyllis

Bowerthane

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2021, 07:43:19 PM »
Admonished by David Hinch’s disappointment in the letters page of Wiþowinde, I have discounted the claims of due diligence for the sake of getting my finger out.  So happy hunting for grammatical etc. errors, folks:

 

 

 
Was that book written/ translated by King Alfred/ the Venerable Bede/ Abbot Alcuin/ Bishop Werferth/ Abbot Aldhelm?

 
Wrāt/ Awent þes bōc Ǣlfred cyning/ Beda/ Alcwine abbod/ Wærferþ biscop/ Aldhelm biscop?

 

 
Is that carven from walrus/ hippopotamus/ mammoth ivory?

 
Āgræfð þes of horshwæltēð/ nicortēð/ feaxede elpendtēð?

 

 
How does the rest of the Finnsburg Fragment go?

 
Hwā gǣð þā lāf þǣre brytten Finnesbyrig?

 

 
Did Abbess Hild and her sisterhood draw that?

 
Ātīefrede Hild addodisse and hiere sweostruhād þes?

 

 
Are those rubies/ shells/ pumice stones from India/ the Gulf of Sheba ( our Persian Gulf)/ Mount Etna?

 
Bēoð þās reodgimmas/ sciella/ fāmstānas fram India/ Scebes Byht/ Etna sē fӯrbeorg?

 

 
Is The Ruin really about Bath, or what?

 
Bēo Đæt Forweorc lā ymb Baþanċeaster, oðþe hwæt?

 

 
No, face coverings are not normal in my land.  There’s a pandemic.

 
Nē, nebbhaman ne sind ġewunelic on mē lande.  Đider is dēadcwalu.

 

 
Are you saying King Alfred once wrote that book?

 
Cwæϸ lā ðū ϸes bōc Ǣlfred cyning ġeara wrāt?

 

 
I will come back with gold.

 
Iċ wille mid golde æthweorfan.

 

 
Can you direct me to Hengest’s Stone/ Horsa’s Barrow/ Edgebright’s Stone/ to where the Britons hid Queen Boudica’s body?

 
Forþwisiġe þū mē Hengestes Stāne/ Horsas Bearwe/  Ecgbeorhtes Stāne/ hwider þā Brettas bedigledon þone flǣsccofan Buddug cwēne?

 

 
What is Solomon and Saturn all about?

 
Ymb hwæt bēo Saloman and Sætern?

 

 
Can you explain the bit about vasa mortis?

 
Āreccest þū þone dǣl ymb vasa mortis?

 

 
I can explain eclipses/ comets/ personal hygiene.

 
Iċ mæġ ymb sunnlosan/ feaxede steorran/ self-clænnes āreccan.

 

 
Does King Alfred put Ælfred mē ġewyrcan het on everything he commissions?

 
Setteþ Ælfred cyning Ælfred mē ġewyrcan het eallum hē ġehǣtt?

 

 
Does Lady Ethelflæd give autographs?

 
Ġiefþ Æþelflǣd hlǽfdiġe handġewritu?

 

 
Is that really carven from the keel of Hengest’s ship?

 
Āgræfð lā þes of þæm cele Hengestes scipe?

 

 
I will come back with gold.

 
Iċ wille mid golde æthweorfan.

 

 
So there is an English version of the Nibelungenlied! Where can I listen to it?

 
Sōþlice, þǣr bēo Englisc fadung þǣm Nibelungeslēoþe? Hwær hlyste iċ him?

 

 
Who wrote Beowulf?

Hwā wrāt Bēowulf?

 

 
Get away!

 
Nē lā!

 

 

 
Watch out for the Normans, I would.

 
Warniað þā Riċardesrīceware, for mē.

 

 

 

« Last Edit: March 05, 2021, 08:02:30 PM by Bowerthane »

David

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2021, 09:13:43 PM »
Bowerthane, this is very impressive. Sometimes I would have used a different word, but probably no better.
Instead of “Aldhelm biscop” I would say “Aldhelm abbod”.
Instead of “mē lande” I would say “mīnum lande”.
Instead of “Đider is dēadcwalu” I would say “Dēaðcwalu is” or “Dēaðcwalu is þǣr”.
Instead of “Horsas” I would say “Horsan”.

Bowerthane

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Re: Old English Phrase Book for the Intrepid Traveller
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2021, 02:57:04 PM »
Thanks David. I'm on it!


( Crumbs, does this mean that I got 'sunlosan' right?  I plumped for a guess at the dative plural)