Gegaderung

Gegaderung => Old English Language => Topic started by: David on December 26, 2013, 11:23:28 AM

Title: The instrumental case
Post by: David on December 26, 2013, 11:23:28 AM

I have a couple of questions about the instrumental case.

1. I understood that the instrumental case was never common in old English and died out in later old English. Is that so? In the 1079 entry in the Peterborough chronicle it says “And þī ilcan ġeare” which sounds like the instrumental to me. Is that so? What is the latest use of the instrumental we can find?

2. In his “First Steps in Old English” Stephen Pollington says that “nouns which form their dative with a change of stem vowel (e.g. ðǣm fēt) in the instrumental still add the –e and do not mutate the stem vowel (e.g. ðӯ fōte). However Hasenfratz and Jambeck in “Reading Old English” say the instrumental is þӯ fēt, and similarly for bōc and mann. Any comments?
Title: Re: The instrumental case
Post by: Linden on December 26, 2013, 12:15:22 PM

.... In his “First Steps in Old English” Stephen Pollington says that “nouns which form their dative with a change of stem vowel (e.g. ðǣm fēt) in the instrumental still add the –e and do not mutate the stem vowel (e.g. ðӯ fōte). However Hasenfratz and Jambeck in “Reading Old English” say the instrumental is þӯ fēt, and similarly for bōc and mann. Any comments?

As I understand it, the only things with distinct forms in the instrumental are some masculine and neuter. singular adjectives and pronouns; everything else is subsumed into the dative forms although still retaining the possibility of an instrumental meaning.