Gegaderung

Gegaderung => Old English Language => Topic started by: Iohannes on January 20, 2012, 08:54:55 AM

Title: How to address a nobleman in OE
Post by: Iohannes on January 20, 2012, 08:54:55 AM
I'm reading the Saxon novels by Bernard Cornwell all in a row; at the moment I'm reading Sword Song. I noticed that noblemen, kings, lords of war etc are addressed with 'lord' in these novels. I know my question might sound silly, but what's the OE equivalent of this 'lord'? 'Dryhten' (but it seems too restricted to a religious area)? 'Hlaford' (it doesn't seem convinging to me)? Incidentally, in the Italian versions of these novels 'lord' in this sense is translated with 'sire' - same spelling but different pronunciation from the English counterpart.

So, what would be the equivalents of '(mi)lord)' or '(mi)lady' in OE?

Thanks and bye for now
Title: Re: How to address a nobleman in OE
Post by: leofwin on January 20, 2012, 11:30:16 AM
'hlaford' or 'hlaford min' sound good to me.

possibly 'ealdor' if the idea of sire/senior/elder is required
Title: Re: How to address a nobleman in OE
Post by: peter horn on January 20, 2012, 01:49:25 PM
Hlaford, earlier hlafweard (guardian of the bread) is the origin of the word Lord. Laverd in ME & used by Geoffrey of Monmouth. B & T gives a number of exanples of use, Hlaford min etc
Title: Re: How to address a nobleman in OE
Post by: Iohannes on January 26, 2012, 10:56:31 AM
Heortlice ├żancie ic inc, hlafordas mine  :D!