Welcome to the discussion forum of Ða Engliscan Gesiðas for all matters relating to the history, language and culture of Anglo-Saxon England. I hope it will provide a useful source of information, stimulate research, and be of real help. Ða Engliscan Gesiðas (The English Companions) maintains a strictly neutral line on all modern and current political and religious matters and it does not follow any particular interpretation of history. Transgression of this Rule will not be tolerated. Any posts which are perceived as breaking this Rule will be deleted with immediate effect without explanation.

Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Old English Language / Re: Word ending agreement
« Last post by Wayne Aelfhere on December 04, 2021, 10:18:29 PM »
Thanks for the correction. And massive thanks for the encouragement to use Gegaderung. I will inwardly digest what I've learned on this valuable visit then when time allows I have another conundrum in mind, but need an early night tonight. I will very gladly return anon! Many many thanks again. Far gesund!
2
Old English Language / Re: Word ending agreement
« Last post by David on December 04, 2021, 09:30:15 PM »
I made a slip “those” should have been “these”.
We want you to use ġegaderung in this way. It is disappointing how little ġegaderung has been used during the pandemic.
3
Old English Language / Re: Word ending agreement
« Last post by Wayne Aelfhere on December 03, 2021, 10:29:44 PM »
Yup, I see what you mean. That's a nice way of explaining it. The gods aren't possessing anything here, it's only England that's doing the possessing. "Gods" rather than "Gods' "! All important apostrophe there. And I see the point with "this/those" agreements. I will print out this thread & keep it as it's a nice explanation.
I do hope you don't mind my asking these things. I can't imagine where else I could go to for help on these so I really appreciate it.
4
Old English Language / Re: Word ending agreement
« Last post by David on December 03, 2021, 09:22:06 AM »
It might help to look at Modern English. Unfortunately now my has been reduced to one case so let me replace “my” with “this” which has a singular and plural, and replace England with man.
We have “I thank those gods” but “I thank this man’s gods”. "This" has gone to the singular to agree “man’s” but “gods” has not gone into the genitive.
In Old English it would be “Iċ þanci(ġ)e þissum godum” and “Iċ þanci(ġ)e þisses mannes godum”.
5
Old English Language / Re: Word ending agreement
« Last post by Wayne Aelfhere on December 02, 2021, 04:29:51 PM »
Hmm...that's a little less straight forward. I understand why the genitive would be appropriate as "Englandes" and it's nice that "min" agrees as "mines", but then if "godum" is still dative, I would have hoped that "min" would still take the dative, or at least that the whole lot would have been genitive. I don't understand why there are differences here. Sorry if that's a stupid question. 🤔
6
Old English Language / Re: Word ending agreement
« Last post by David on December 02, 2021, 12:10:34 PM »
Now you are happy with that I can mention the genitive.
1.     The possessive adjectives are just the genitive forms of the personal pronouns but in the case of “my”, “our” and “your” they are declined as adjectives.
2.     Instead of "English" you could use the genitive "England’s" although it does not sound right in Modern English. This gives “Iċ þanci(ġ)e mīnes englalandes godum”. Notice that “mīn” takes the genitive ending from “englalandes” whereas I think it more logical to take the dative ending from “godum”.
7
Old English Language / Re: Word ending agreement
« Last post by Wayne Aelfhere on December 01, 2021, 09:58:32 PM »
Brilliant, thank you David. That's actually relatively straight forward, (in theory at least!) ....dative all the way! That's the key, that the adjectives follow what they are describing, which is the dative noun. Now to learn all those pesky endings! 😁 Many thanks & every best wish to you.
8
Old English Language / Re: Word ending agreement
« Last post by David on December 01, 2021, 10:32:02 AM »
In the sentence “I thank my English gods” “gods” is the object of the verb “thank” and so is in the dative case. “My” and “English” are adjectives and so take the case, number and gender of what they are describing, gods, and so are in the dative plural masculine. Then “English” is in the weak form of the adjective because it is specified by “my”. Adjectives are specified by the definite article “the”, the pronouns “this” or “that” or a possessive adjective such as “my”. So I would translate “I thank my English gods” as “Iċ þanci(ġ)e mīnum englisċum godum”.
9
Old English Language / Word ending agreement
« Last post by Wayne Aelfhere on November 30, 2021, 09:12:03 PM »
Hello one and all. I hope this finds you well.
Just a quick basic one on agreement of word endings...do they all simply take the case of the first bit (until something else happens in the sentence)?
So, for example, if we were translating "I thank my English gods" - "my" would have a dative ending (because following "þancian") so would "English" and "gods" also have dative endings?
Or is there a whiff of genitive here?

10
News & Events / Re: Battle Wreath Laying
« Last post by Locian on November 01, 2021, 06:47:05 PM »
I second Eanflaed's comment.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10