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Author Topic: Weak and Strong Adjectives  (Read 7622 times)

David

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Weak and Strong Adjectives
« on: August 09, 2013, 04:10:25 PM »
 I was playing about with weak and strong adjectives trying out different cases.  I assumed that mīn and ōþer are always strong. Is that true?  Then have I got lytel correct below.
 
1. It is my small horse                         Hit is mīn lytle hors
2. My horse is small                            Mīn hors is lytel
3. The small horse is mine                  Ðæt lytle hors is mīn
4. That horse of mine is small             Ðæt mīn hors is lytel
5. That small horse of mine                 Ðæt mīn lytle horse
6. My other small horse                       Mīn ōþer lytle hors
7. My small horse is very small           Mīn lytle hors is swīðe lytel
« Last Edit: October 28, 2013, 08:37:14 AM by David »

Jayson

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Re: Weak and Strong Adjectives
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2013, 03:04:33 AM »
I'm doing the Correspondence Course and just got to the section on Weak Adjectives.  According to the lesson, these follow demonstratives such as 'this, that, these, those' and also 'the' when it means a particular one i.e. the little shop on the corner (not any other).   Does that help?
Wessex Woman

Jayson

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Re: Weak and Strong Adjectives
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2013, 04:21:51 AM »
---I'm so chuffed, I have to tell you all:  I'VE DONE IT!   I've finhished the 8 lesson correspondence course, which my daughter gave me as a Christmas present two years ago.   The course basically teaches you how to READ Old English and I know I shall have to do more in order to write it, but I was delighted to find that I could read the last twelve questions in the last lesson with no problem.
Anyone have any suggestions as to what the best thing is to do now?
Wessex Woman

David

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Re: Weak and Strong Adjectives
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2013, 08:41:27 AM »
 
 
Well done on finishing the course. I think it is delightful that your daughter gave it to you as a Christmas present. As for what to do next my advice is always Stephen Pollington’s book “First Steps in Old English”. You can even get a CD of him reading from that and some literature.
 
 
I have just bought “Reading Old English” by Robert Hasenfratz and Thomas Jambeck. This is over 500 pages but I bought it second hand, in very good condition, from Amazon for less than £10, including postage. It has only just come but I can say it is another book to teach yourself the language. One thing I like is that it uses “ċ” and “ġ” as well as macrons to help with pronunciation.
 
 
To read old English I would recommend the Anglo-Saxon chronicles. These are much easier to read than poetry.
 
 
Going beyond old English I am reading how the language changed during the middle English period. Going the other direction I am reading what it was like in the Germanic period.
 
« Last Edit: October 20, 2013, 08:43:01 AM by David »

Linden

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Re: Weak and Strong Adjectives
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2013, 09:40:06 AM »
---.................................................
Anyone have any suggestions as to what the best thing is to do now?
That depends on whether you have an ultimate goal in mind.  You mentioned writing in Old English - is that what you want to do?  Are you more interested in prose or poetry?
I would recommend lots of reading (and re-reading) of OE texts looking also, if possible, at more than one translation of each text and at where and why they differ.  This would improve your available vocabulary and consolidate your recently acquired knowledge of OE grammar. 
 
Cræft biþ betere ðonne æhta

wulfgar2

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Re: Weak and Strong Adjectives
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2013, 08:53:35 PM »
Hi Jayson
The best thing for you to do now is to buy as many texts as you can, new or second hand, even the dreaded 'homilies' and read something for half an hour every day (well perhaps five days a week). If you leave things for a month or so you will have to put in a big effort to get back to where you were before.
All the best
Harry

Jayson

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Re: Weak and Strong Adjectives
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2013, 07:20:56 PM »
---many thanks, everyone, on your suggestions as to what I do next.   You are right, Harry, I must keep at it NOW or as you say, I shall find it harder to get back into the saddle, so to speak.   I do have  a  jumble-sale copy of Mark Atherton's 'Old English' which I might try next and also a copy of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles.   I could try to read a year at a time from that.   Yes, I should like to be able to read the poetry such as Beowulf but I do realise that this might be more difficult, and yes, I should like to be able to write A-S but thinking of all those endings, and the  --  how many is it?  --  multiple ways and whens of saying 'the', does tend to scare me!!!
Wessex Woman

David

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Re: Weak and Strong Adjectives
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2013, 08:36:15 AM »
 
 
Mark Atherton’s book is nice as it gives a slightly different view and uses some texts you might not have come across. He tells you how to pronounce a few words but he does not use any accents. Therefore I would suggest that you get the CD that goes with it.
 
 
I was always scared of making mistakes which is partly why I have a disastrous history of learning languages. Probably we should take the plunge and learn from our mistakes, not worry about them.
 
« Last Edit: October 28, 2013, 08:37:52 AM by David »