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Author Topic: Anglo-Saxon Names Brought to Life  (Read 6573 times)

peter horn

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Anglo-Saxon Names Brought to Life
« on: November 28, 2014, 04:52:18 PM »
I have been sent an interesting paper by Oswin Kinsey


dealing with English Compound Names - AS Names brought to life.


He welcomes comments from those interested in this area of study


http://oswinkinsey.wordpress.com/


Peter
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Eanflaed

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Names Brought to Life
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2014, 11:50:38 AM »
It makes fascinating reading - though it doesn't give the meaning for the "Ean" part of "Eanflæd" :( . There should be more of it!!

John Nicholas Cross

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Names Brought to Life
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2014, 04:09:14 PM »
I've been interested in the meanings of Anglo-Saxon personal names for many years.   I greatly welcome your preliminary catalogue but believe there is much more detail to be added to it.   I think that the names that are comprised of two Anglo-Saxon elements, need greater explanation,  eg.   cuth- bert  =   'well known- bright'  ;   aelf-red =   'elf- council'   ;    ead - mund  =   'riches- protection'  etc,  etc.

Were the people aware of the meaning of their names, that had presumably been given to them by their parents?   I guess they were.
Also, as Eanflaed says, there are several names missing.

A very worthy contribution to studies of the period, I hope is goes from strength to strength and is published.

John.

Deoran

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Names Brought to Life
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2014, 01:54:27 PM »
Whilst Anglo-Saxons would surely have understood what their dithematic names meant, whether that meaning regularly impinged upon their thinking is perhaps the more interesting question. There are cases where it clearly did, e.g. Æthelræd unræd and Wulfstan's Sermon of the Wolf. But there are other cases where perhaps they didn't: I understand that Ælfred is curious name for a West Saxon to choose, since it is more Northumbrian, incorporating the Anglian form of the word for elf; presumably, it was chosen because it sounded good? For what hopes would a parent have for a child in invoking the idea of "elf council" for them? Maybe a significance now lost to us? Parental aspirations seem much more obvious with names like Æthelræd.
Although I know what my name means (albeit derived from a very foreign language), it is the name itself, not its meaning, that is important to my identity. I rarely give the meaning a passing thought. Would the average Anglo-Saxon have been the same? What about non-Anglo-Saxons who took Old English dithematic names?

peter horn

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Names Brought to Life
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2014, 04:28:58 PM »
It makes fascinating reading - though it doesn't give the meaning for the "Ean" part of "Eanflæd" :( . There should be more of it!!


Oswin informs me that he has updated his paper to include meaning of 'Ean.'
he cannot at present reply on this thread because he is not (yet) a member of the Fellowship.
Peter
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Eanflaed

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Re: Anglo-Saxon Names Brought to Life
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2014, 03:22:59 PM »
Looking forward to finding out when he joins us! Though as Deoran says, the name is more important than the meaning (for both my real name and my Anglo-Saxon one here).