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Author Topic: BBC Radio 4 on OE riddles  (Read 5620 times)

Linden

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BBC Radio 4 on OE riddles
« on: January 19, 2018, 01:59:01 PM »
On Tuesday there is a 12 minute program on the Old English riddles from the puzzle perspective. It's part of a short series on puzzles.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09nvrhq
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David

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Re: BBC Radio 4 on OE riddles
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2018, 02:42:23 PM »
Thank you Linden.


I listened to today's broadcast and the one yesterday. I thought they were both interesting but superficial.

Linden

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Re: BBC Radio 4 on OE riddles
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2018, 12:53:55 PM »
Yes -it's a shame that the episodes are so short and attempt to cover so much but they would give at least a 'flavour' of their subjects to people who have not come across them before.  I especially liked Dr Katie Lowe's statement that she doubted whether the Anglo-Saxons themselves saw much of a distinction between [the riddlic nature of at least some of] their poetry (such as the Dream of the Rood) and their riddles.

Chris Maslanka's description of the script of the Exeter Book as equally spaced in its letters, words and lines was also interesting.  At first sight, this would appear to be the case to someone unfamiliar with OE script but it is not true.  Although the overall impression is of neatness, some words are more spaced out or more compressed than the norm; there are occasionally spaces within 'words' and lack of spaces between 'words'; and sometimes the script falls below or rides above the general line of the text.

(One aspect of my current research on the Exeter Book riddles is to assess whether there is any significance in these and other 'scribal oddities'.)
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