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Author Topic: Learning a little more every day  (Read 7949 times)

Phyllis

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Learning a little more every day
« on: June 12, 2011, 08:35:30 PM »
Hello all

Some of you were kind enough to make helpful suggestions while I was working through the OE language correspondence course, and it was very motivating for me. So here I am again because I am now trying to improve my limited skills by working through a different course (this time, Stephen Pollington's book and CD set).

I realised that I have not been keeping up with it as rigorously as I did with the previous course and so decided to see whether blathering on in the forum would make me work a little harder  :)

Initial experience: it's very diferent! I like the way it is chunked up into digestible chapters. And I like being able to check my answers to exercises straight away - instant gratification (or otherwise) is the way to go!

But I do find it a llittle confusing in that it introduces the cases/declensions/genders in parts rather than together as a set. In case you haven't seen it, what I mean is that it might introduce, for example, the third person singular and plural (he and they), but not the first of second persons (I and you and we and lots of yous). I was taught the old-fashioned way at school to decline verbs and memorise cases (amo, amas, amat etc), so that is what I find easier - but fortunately we all learn in different ways so hopefully this way would suit others better.

I also like having a bigger set of vocabulary from the start - it feels like I am getting down to "real" Englisc more quickly. Unfortunately I am very lazy at learning the words, so need to sit and do that - if only my mum would test me like in the old days  :P

Anyway, thanks for listening.
Phyllis

Karen Carlson

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Re: Learning a little more every day
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2011, 09:26:48 PM »
Yes, one of the things I like about First Steps is that it is broken into manageable chunks.  I haven't taken the correspondence course, so don't know what it does, but compared to other beginning OE books, another strength of Steve's book is that he is not afraid to make up examples.  Most textbooks I've seen seem to think they are limited to OE written a thousand years ago, rather than making up little stories like Steve does -- stories that fit the OE period, but good reading practice without too many complexities.

Karen

David

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Re: Learning a little more every day
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2011, 05:19:10 PM »
I started learning englisc last year and thought I could add some comments.

I am also working through First Steps in Old English, having done the companions’ correspondence course.
I agree that the extra vocabulary is nice, especially day to day words. Learn Old English with Leofwin takes that even further.

I am not sure I agree about the instant answers. I started with Teach Yourself Old English where you also just had to turn over the pages for the answers. I found I skimped on strong verbs,i mutation and adverbial word order. I did much better when I had to present the work to someone else and they commented on it.

There are two other useful things about the correspondence course. There was always someone to ask about problems. Also there are grammar booklets. I take one, at random, with me  every day  and work through it while walking along. So far I have avoided walking into anyone or walking under a car.

I also used A User-Friendly Dictionary of Old English which had some grammar. That did not use the later West Saxon contractions in the weak class 1 verbs. So the standard courses say ðu sendst was too difficult to pronounce so became ðu sentst (which is no problem!) and he sendð became he sent. If you use the uncontracted forms ðu sendest and he sendeð you do not have that problem. 

Linden

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Re: Learning a little more every day
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2011, 05:58:32 PM »
I started learning englisc last year and thought I could add some comments.
............... There was always someone to ask about problems. ..................

You could try posting your queries on the Gegaderung.  There is usually someone who can answer your question although many of our real experts only infrequently visit the site.
Cræft biþ betere ðonne æhta

Karen Carlson

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Re: Learning a little more every day
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2011, 11:49:55 PM »
When I worked through First Steps (around a decade ago!), Steve was offering a companion correspondence course with it.  That did help, and provided some additional exercises.

Karen

Roge

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Re: Learning a little more every day
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2011, 09:18:59 PM »
Would you all advise starting the correspondence course before for example Stephen Pollingtons first steps?

Phyllis

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Re: Learning a little more every day
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2011, 05:40:02 PM »
Would you all advise starting the correspondence course before for example Stephen Pollingtons first steps?

Personally I am glad I did it that way but I think it depends on your learning style. The correspondence course is quite traditional (very well explained but still focuses on traditional approach to grammar); Stephen P's book breaks it up differently.

Not sure if that helps - but a look at the first lesson in the correspondence course might help you decide?

wes þu hal
Phyllis

Roge

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Re: Learning a little more every day
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2011, 09:01:44 PM »
Thank you Phyllis,

For my second question to any one reading this has anyone tried the course whilst abroad for example? I am due to leave the Country for six months shortly and wonder if it would still be worth while having a crack at it.

I will need something to occupy myself when not working any suggestions or direction to whom I should aim this question at ?