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Author Topic: Dialects  (Read 6229 times)

David

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Dialects
« on: September 05, 2011, 09:35:31 AM »

Can ayone tell me about books on old English dialects or where else I can get information ?
As I live in Kent I am particularly intetested in the Kentish dialect.

Brian Murrell

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Re: Dialects
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2011, 07:17:49 PM »

Try Meresborough Books, I am not sure of there address, but they are in Rainham Kent at the "Rainham Bookshop," they specialise in books on Kent and publish the "Bygone Kent" monthly journal.

Brian

Wulfric

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Re: Dialects
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2011, 10:01:25 PM »
Eala,

I'm 'feared it be nawt to do with Kent but I've a dear lill' book on th' Demshur dialect. A prapper lill' read it be.

It's called "The Devonshire Dialect" by Clement Marten. It is small, not quite 50 pages of A5, but has some brief discussion, fun anecdotes and example texts as well as a curious dialect dictionary.

Interestingly the Wiki page on the West country dialect linked in another thread mentioned the use of gender in the dialect. Here's how it's summarised in this book.

"In Dem ees an er an' ers a ee, all 'cept the'aud Tom cat an' even ees a er!"
(In Devon he is a her and she is a he, all except the old Tom cat and even he is a her!)

I have experienced of this from my time living in central to west Devon, it is delightful if a little confusing at times.

Horsa

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Re: Dialects
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2011, 04:28:32 PM »
There's a bit on Kentish here.

There's a list of texts in the different dialects here.

Georius - JB

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Re: Dialects
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2011, 07:58:38 PM »
If you're also interested in the purely linguistic (phonetic) aspect of Old English dialects, I can recommend R. M. Hogg's (1992) A Grammar of Old English: Phonology (Vol. 1), which has up-to-date treatments of most Old English dialectal developments, all formalised in generative equations.

Roge

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Re: Dialects
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2011, 07:41:27 PM »
I know that the West Country accent is one of the oldest so I'm told, is this the primary reason when watching programmes I.E.1066 the Englisc folk have a West Country brrr as me Pops would say.

peter horn

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Re: Dialects
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2011, 08:21:27 PM »
I know that the West Country accent is one of the oldest so I'm told, is this the primary reason when watching programmes I.E.1066 the Englisc folk have a West Country brrr as me Pops would say.
[/quote

actors usually do a made -up country accent called 'mummerset' which is used to cover accents generally.
Ic ∂ær ær wæs
Ic ∂æt ær dyde

leofwin

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Re: Dialects
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2011, 09:27:19 AM »
I rather like to think that Suffolk may have a claim to the 'oldest' accent - that's where the English first called the coast of Britannia, after all.

(no parochialism here - i'm an essex man)