Welcome to the discussion forum of Ða Engliscan Gesiðas for all matters relating to the history, language and culture of Anglo-Saxon England. I hope it will provide a useful source of information, stimulate research, and be of real help. Ða Engliscan Gesiðas (The English Companions) maintains a strictly neutral line on all modern and current political and religious matters and it does not follow any particular interpretation of history. Transgression of this Rule will not be tolerated. Any posts which are perceived as breaking this Rule will be deleted with immediate effect without explanation.

Author Topic: Gelimp on dæge  (Read 13164 times)

Horsa

  • Guest
Gelimp on dæge
« on: November 21, 2011, 05:57:53 PM »
On þǽre ealdan gegaderunge, hæfdon wé sumne þrǽd þǽr man mote be ænigum þinge wrítan bútan hit wǽre on þǽre ealdan engliscre sprǽce. Hit helpe man tó leornianne and hit síe gamen éac, þynceþ mé. Is forþy gód anginn.

Ic eode tó þǽm tóþ-lǽce for þríe dagas. Ic hæbbe ege fram þǽm tóþ-lǽce, ac þá ic sætt, seah ic on þǽm wáge þǽs tóþlǽces scóle-cartan. Is efne swá híe secgaþ “ne gieme þú þǽs; se tóþ-lǽce wát hwæt he déþ. Ac þá ic læg and se tóþ-lǽce hæfde pílas on mínum múþe, þá þorfte ic oþer, ungelice “ne gieme þú þǽs” cartan. Ic beseah up tó fyrste and seah þǽr metinge mid cattbearnum þe hæfdon butterfléoge feþra.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2013, 12:43:42 PM by peter horn »

Jayson

  • Hlaford
  • ****
  • Posts: 302
  • Knowledge is of no use unless it is passed on...
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2012, 07:06:59 PM »
Hello Horsa!

Would you be very kind and help me with the translation of your A-S piece?   I'm still very much a novice and I've been working on it for a few hours now!

So far, this is what I've got:


On the old Forum we had some thread(s) where we were allowed to write on anything as long as it was in Old English.   It helps (one?) to learn it and also gives a chace of displaying skill.

I went to the dentist for three days/three days ago (?).   I am afraid of the dentist but as I sat there I saw on the wall the dentist's certificate.   It is just as he says 'Don't give me that', the dentist knows what he's doing.   But as I lay there the dentist put 'sticks' (the drill?) in my mouth.  I needed a different "Don't give me that" certifice.   I looked at above the fireplace and saw a painting with a kitten which had a butterfly  (fethra??).


BTW, I love the idea of a dentist being a tooth-leech!

I went to t
Wessex Woman

Horsa

  • Guest
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2012, 03:17:37 PM »
This is what I intended to write, if it's what I said in Old English then bonus points go to me!

On the old gegaderung, we had a certain thread where we could write anything we liked as long as it was in Old English. It would help one to learn, and it's fun too, it seems to me. Because of that it's a good undertaking.

I went to the dentist today. I'm afraid of the dentist but when I sat, I saw on the wall the dentist's degree certificate, It's just like they were saying "don't worry about it; the dentist knows what he's doing." But when I lay and the dentist had spikes in my mouth, I needed another different 'don't worry about it" poster. I looked up to the ceiling and saw a picture with kittens which had butterfly wings.


'spikes in my mouth' sounds a bit strange in Modern English, but I'd told that story a few times and that's exactly how I described the dentist doing his stuff. I was amused by the images presented to the patient. Credentials before the procedure, whimsical fantasy during the procedure.

Now that I read it back, I don't think 'efne swa' means 'just like', I need something that says 'as if'. I think 'secgaþ' should have been in the subjunctive.

I translated 'tóþ-lǽc' from the Swedish 'tandläkare'. It's interesting how different the word tooth-leech is in feeling from tandläkare.

Horsa

  • Guest
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2012, 09:30:53 PM »
Ic ne wrát hér for manigum mónþum forþǽmþe ne swá mycel gelimpþ mé þe is wéorþ tó wrítanne.

Ac, on Saturnesdæg ic scéat flán ǽrstum síþe. Mín nefene hæfde symble for gebyrdtíde. Hire licaþ wel Zelda. Héo hæfþ ealle þá gamene, þá bóca, ocarina, and furþum þá gewǽdu þæt héo mæg efenlǽcan Link. Hwæt elles mæg héo fón bútan bógan, gelíce Linkes ælfenbogan? Wé ealle éodon tó þǽre healle þǽr man mót scéotan. Héo lét mé brúcan bógan. Ic næs til ac næfre næs mé swá tó gamene siþþan ic scéat spere æt West Stówe for tíen géarum.

Catte

  • Guest
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2012, 05:42:47 PM »
Ðes morgen, ic ne beðearfede leohtfatu gebrycgan, ðæt leoht wæs genog. Foranlencten bið geancumen  :)

Catte

  • Guest
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2013, 01:47:31 PM »
Ðes morgen, ic seah þǽt tungol Woden. Seah hwa þone cometan ?

Jayson

  • Hlaford
  • ****
  • Posts: 302
  • Knowledge is of no use unless it is passed on...
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2013, 03:29:36 PM »
Am I right: 
This morning I saw the Woden Star.  Who (else) saw the comet?
Nese, ac ic wille eac this Tungol scheawian.
[apologies for no macrons, etc.]
BTW, does anyone else think that Tungol is a very odd word for Old English?   Sounds more like Hungarian or some other Eastern European language.   Does anyone know where it comes from?
 
Wessex Woman

peter horn

  • Hlaford
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2013, 05:16:35 PM »

BTW, does anyone else think that Tungol is a very odd word for Old English?   Sounds more like Hungarian or some other Eastern European language.   Does anyone know where it comes from?



Proto germanic word for star or other heavenly body
Peter
Ic ∂ær ær wæs
Ic ∂æt ær dyde

Catte

  • Guest
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2013, 05:27:06 PM »
My understanding is that tungol can be any heavenly body, so I was using it for Woden's planet = Mercury, as I've seen various assertions that they would be equivalent deities, and I can't find an AS name for Mercury, even though it's a (tricky to spot) naked eye visible planet.
I meant 'hwa' as a preposition for 'anyone' or 'someone' - has anybody seen the comet [ISON]? Sadly, it's not 'anybody else' as I haven't managed to see it (yet).

Deoran

  • gesith
  • **
  • Posts: 52
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2013, 07:31:13 PM »
 Ic oneardie middum byrig ond forþy ic ne mihte fela tunglu bewitian na. Biþ þæt cræftlic leoht to micel.  :(

Catte

  • Guest
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2013, 10:12:21 PM »
Ðæt cræftlic leoht biþ wearn :(
Ða ufanweardu tungol beoþ eaþfyndean.

Catte

  • Guest
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2013, 10:51:58 PM »

David

  • Ealdormann
  • *****
  • Posts: 607
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2013, 09:09:28 AM »

I think you are a bit early for the comet. Wait until December. Even then we never seem to correctly predict how bright they will be.

As for planets I think they are telescopic objects, even good in a medium home telescope. You can see the waxing and waning of the crescents of Mercury and Venus; the polar cap and storms on Mars; the belts, storms and moons of Jupiter – also the dark blotches in 1994 after comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 broke up and hit it; the rings of Saturn and their disappearance when edge on allowing you to see more of its moons, the beautiful pale ice-blue-green of Uranus and the beautiful pale ice-blue of Neptune. Our ancestors missed a lot.

Tungol does sound a strange word but I am not surprised that Peter tells us that it comes from Proto Germanic as it appears in so many compounds, but what was the Germanic word? The word star has a long history with steorra in Englisc and I believe sternan or sterron in Germanic and I think that once I saw its, supposed, Proto Indo European ancestor but I cannot remember what that was.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2013, 09:11:42 AM by David »

Linden

  • Hlaford
  • ****
  • Posts: 391
  • Essex scirgerefa
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2013, 01:06:50 PM »
Cræft biþ betere ðonne æhta

Catte

  • Guest
Re: Gelimp on dæge
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2013, 05:41:13 PM »
David,  Ic hope ðone cometan ne brice ac onywe leohtan in Midwintermonðes.
Ic wille seon Uranus ac Neptune gemicled.

[I'm assuming I should use the subjunctive for the 'I'd like to see . .' construction but I'm probably getting overambitious for my knowledge of OE grammar.]