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Author Topic: Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon  (Read 7084 times)

Wulfhelm

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Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon
« on: February 10, 2012, 11:25:09 PM »
Hello all,

I have been given the task of doing a cover of a song which is in Norwegian, but I would like to perform my version in Anglo-Saxon. The track is titled 'Det Som Engang Var' which I am led to believe is 'What Once Was'.

So, first off - how would one say this in O.E.? 'Once' is a bit of a difficult one, and the best I can come up with is 'Hwa Forewæs', although I'm not convinced that makes any sense!

Here are the full lyrics in Norwegian:

Imellom buskene vi stirret paa de
som minnet om andre tider
og fortalte at haapet var borte
for alltid...

Vi hoerte alvesang og vann som
sildret

Det som en gang var er nu borte
alt blodet...
all lengsel og sorg som hersket
og de foelelser som kunne roeres
er vekk...
for alltid...
vi har aldri levd

And in English:

Between the bushes we stared
At those who reminded us of another age
And told that hope was away
Forever...
We heard elvensong and
Water that trickled
What once was is now
Away
All the blood...
All the longing and pain that
Ruled
Are away...
Forever...
We are not dead...
We have never lived

My attempt at translation:

Between the bushes we stared
Betwux bremlas we starodedon

At those who reminded us of another age
On þam hwa gemyndged us of oþres ielde

And told that hope was away (gone?)
And abodenne hopan wæs agæn

Forever...
Ecelicne...

We heard elvensong and
We hieredon ælfensoncræft and

Water that trickled
Mereflod dreopende

What once was is now
Hwa forewæs biþ

Away (gone?)
agæn

All the blood...
Eall þæt blod...

All the longing and pain that
Eall þæt longaþ and wærc þæt

Ruled
onstyrede

Are away (gone?)...
beoþ agæn

Forever...
Ecelicne...

We are not dead...
We ne beoþ dead...

We have never lived
We ne alifdedon




Any help with this would be massively appreciated!

Linden

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Re: Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2012, 12:06:07 AM »
...................The track is titled 'Det Som Engang Var' which I am led to believe is 'What Once Was'.

So, first off - how would one say this in O.E.? ....................

If you want to keep both the rhythm and the feeling of the original, then something like

'þæt þe hwilum wæs'?

'Hwilum' is often used in the sense of 'once in the past' in OE poetry.
Cræft biþ betere ðonne æhta

David

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Re: Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2012, 10:45:42 AM »

I liked it a lot.

I was wondering about

All the longing and pain that
Eall þӕt longaþ and wӕrc þӕt

I would have used se instead of the first þӕt and possibly þe instead of the second þӕt.
Is there some grammar here that I do not understand or some nuance in Norwegian ?
Can you explain this to me.

Thanks,
David

leofwin

  • Guest
Re: Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2012, 11:25:18 AM »


I'd go for 'ær' in the sense 'before', 'earlier in time' ... 'once'

hwæt ær wæs

Horsa

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Re: Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2012, 07:51:44 PM »
There's a line missing from the English translation and a line missing from the Norwegian version.

all lengsel og sorg som hersket
all longing and sorrow which ruled
og de følelser som kunne røres
and the feelings which could be touched
er vekk...
are gone

I'd say

eall longaþ and sorg
and þa felunga þe man mihte hrepan
sindon ágáne (Past participles work like adjectives, longaþ is masc. sorg is feminine as is felung - a coining for emotions or feelings - I think that when there's a group of different gender nouns all described with one adjective, the adjective takes a masculine plural ending. Also, the pre-conquest English were a little more sparing with their use of the definite article than we or the Norwegians are. Sweet's Primer says that the definite article is something halfway between a definite and demonstrative article.)

Also, the Norwegian text doesn't have the penultimate line of the English text "We are not dead", which I presume would be somethintg like 'vi er ikke døde'.

I've also started to mess a little with your translation where I have perceived errors. I have included an explanation for most of my changes.

Between the bushes we stared
Betwux bremlum we starodon (betwux takes the dative when it's a prepostion)

At those who reminded us of another age
On þam þe gemunde us oþerra ielda (Age is feminine. I found in B&T that gemunan which is normally remember, is used as remind with the genitive - to put in mind, remind a person of something, charge with :-- Ic gemunde þé fácnes, þǽr nán næs)

And told that hope was away (gone?)
And rehte þæt hopan wæs ágán  (bodian seems most often to translate as preach. Reccan means recount.)

Forever...
for á... (écelic is an adjective. á is an adverb)

We heard elvensong and
We híerdon ælfensong and

Water that trickled
wæter dreopende (mereflod is a deluge or a flood, )

What once was is now
þætte hwílum wæs is nú (though I like Leofwin's suggestion, I prefer Linden's as it preserves the original rhythm)

Away (gone?)
ágán

All the blood...
Eall þæt blod...

(middle bit - see above)

Forever...
For á

We are not dead...
Wé ne sindon déade...

We have never lived
Wé ne lífodon

Horsa

  • Guest
Re: Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2012, 03:37:37 PM »
oops, missed 'ruled'

eall longaþ and sorg þe onstéordon
and þa felunga þe man mihte hrepan
sindon ágáne

Plural ending because of compound subject.

Wulfhelm

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Re: Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2012, 09:02:15 PM »
Just want to thank you guys for all the help! Didn't know I'd missed a line, Horsa!

Horsa

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Re: Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2012, 02:40:13 PM »
I like English, Scandinavian languages, Old English and extreme metal so this was a lot of fun for me. The only thing that could have made it completely perfect is if the song were about beer and kung fu.

When are you performing this song? Is there any chance someone could record it and upload it to Youtube?

Is the translation yours?

Wulfhelm

  • Guest
Re: Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon
« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2012, 05:40:28 PM »
I'm recording the track for a compilation due out in a couple of months (as a free download if my understanding holds true!) I have already edited together a video for the track set for Youtube. The translation from Norwegian to English was taken from the official Burzum website - the original ad hoc translation to OE was my own. :)

Wulfhelm

  • Guest
Re: Norwegian -> English -> Anglo-Saxon
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2012, 07:18:12 PM »
I wanted to once more thank everybody for their input, you can watch the finished product here!