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Author Topic: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc  (Read 10884 times)

Hogspark

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Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« on: January 11, 2013, 12:15:27 PM »
Could anyone tell me what our people called it? Suspect the word have possibly been s..t haus or similar?

peter horn

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2013, 03:36:26 PM »
Could anyone tell me what our people called it? Suspect the word have possibly been s..t haus or similar?




mixene/meoxine
"Job sæt on his mixene"  (B & T)


There is a plant "mixenwyrt" (nightshade) noted for growing in such places.

David

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2013, 04:17:19 PM »
 
Try the word gangern.
 

Hogspark

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2013, 11:36:44 AM »
What does gangern mean David?

Hogspark

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2013, 11:37:52 AM »
Thank you Peter-that's interesting!

peter horn

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2013, 11:41:37 AM »

Try the word gangern.


'going to a place'
problematic term
from late glosses   Ælfc / Som and Wrt Voc


even when combined with 'digle' (secret/hidden), not clear cut meaning

David

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2013, 03:49:05 PM »
 
 
I agree that gangern has not a clear cut meaning; just like toilet, lavatory, loo and nettie. For clear cut meaning maybe you should go for scittehūs. The point is what was actually used. I have not seen anything in the little old English I have read. I suggested gangern as it was used in wiþowinde  157 in Learn Old English with Leofwin. When I looked up gangern in both the Clark Hall and the Bosworth dictionaries they gave toilet. When I looked up toilet in Stephen Pollington’s Wordcraft it gave gangern and rynatūn. Rynatūn also has not a claear cut meaning. However I have not seen rynatūn elsewhere.
 

Hogspark

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2013, 11:27:27 AM »
Again, thanks Peter and David-if only we could talk to them! I would think, as David says, that scittehus is the most likely in the vernacular as we still have the word shit in our language; I wonder what our Friesian cousins say.....Mike P.

cenwulf

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2013, 01:14:49 PM »
I wonder what our Friesian cousins say.
 

According to http://wikitravel.org/en/West_Frisian_phrasebook
Quote
Where is the toilet?   
Wêr is it húske?
My Frisian colleague had to look it up, but she says it means little house/hut

peter horn

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2013, 04:22:26 PM »
Could anyone tell me what our people called it? Suspect the word have possibly been s..t haus or similar?




mixene/meoxine
"Job sæt on his mixene"  (B & T)


There is a plant "mixenwyrt" (nightshade) noted for growing in such places.


The only word that we have evidence of use by the AS is 'mixene'


though 'scitte' amd 'hus' are undoubtably from the OE, the combination ot these two words would seem to
come later than the AS period.

Linden

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2013, 05:26:19 PM »
 It would seem that our ancestors had just as many variants for ‘the smallest room’ as today’s folk.
Among the words for a ‘privy’ listed in Bosworth and Toller - apart from ‘gang-ern’ are ‘ears-gang‘, ‘forþ-gang‘, ‘gang/geng’, ‘genge’, ‘grepe‘, ‘fel-tun‘, ‘forþ-gang‘,‘gang-pyt(t)’, ‘gang-setl‘, ‘gang-tun’, ‘gold-hord-hus’ and ‘ut-gang’.
The actual seat on which you might sit was called a ‘gang-setl’ or ‘gang-stol’.
The unfortunate cleaner of the place was called a ‘gang-feormere’.
The lowermost deck of the ark was described as containing the ‘gangpyt’ and ‘myxen’ interpreted in Bosworth & Toller as the privy and dunghill respectively.
‘Earsgang is - according to B&T, used in the leechdoms both as the place of excretion (twice) and the act of excretion.
Cræft biþ betere ðonne æhta

Hogspark

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2013, 01:01:43 PM »
Thanks Cenwulf, Peter and Linden-much obliged. Mike P.

leofwin

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2013, 07:43:43 PM »
I like 'goldhordhus :)

Jayson

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2013, 06:03:33 PM »
 I like 'goldhordhus :)     do þæt þu don wylt, beo ðæt þu beon wylt     ---As to 'goldhordhus' I take this to be like the term 'throne' , used by the Victorians.   Not much different, are we, when it comes to the use of language!   BTW, my Old English isn't too good, but am I right in interpreting your line below as 'do what you want to do, be who you want to be'?
Wessex Woman

leofwin

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Re: Toilet/Lavatory/Loo/Nettie etc
« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2013, 08:39:52 PM »
Yes!